Newark, Essex Co.

Early-20th-century newspaper discussions about the Jaques family of Woodbridge, New Jersey

I’ve written about various members of the Jaques family before; and have learned never to get too cocky about the family tree I’ve put together for them. Whenever I think I have things wrapped up in a pretty little bow, something inevitably comes along that knocks me off my pedestal.

But, it’s good to know I am not the first, nor probably the last, to be stumped about certain aspects of the family tree; I have letters written by grandchildren of James Angus and Wealthy Jaques Angus in which information is shared, sifted, and sorted through, and questions are raised.

One area of confusion concerned Wealthy’s grandfather Samuel Barron Jaques (1730-1799) and who exactly his parents were. I did a post on that in March 2013 (see: “Samuel B. Jaques (d. 1798/9) of Woodbridge, New Jersey“) and seemed to be able to draw a few conclusions there.

From Samuel on down, things seem pretty clear; see my post “Striking gold: Gleanings from the Samuel Barron Jaques family Bible” which includes a clipping from the Newark News containing information written by James Angus Knowles, a grandson of Wealthy’s. The family Bible information is fantastic, of course, but if the information in the clipping is indeed correct, it indicates (as I’ve remarked before) that Samuel and his wife Mary Coddington had a 39-year age difference and that their children started arriving when Samuel was in his early sixties. (Wealthy & James Angus’s grandchildren found that remarkable as well.) So, perhaps, someday evidence of a 1st marriage will surface.

In any event, I’ve come across more Newark News communications regarding the Jaques Family history. So, evidently the clipping I found almost two years ago and put in that “Striking gold” post was one of a number of “back and forths” James Angus Knowles had via the paper’s “Jersey Genealogy” column, circa 1914-1915. Some entry numbers mentioned are not in my possession (i.e., 4912 and 4938) so I can’t include them here, obviously.

I’ve had a quick look through them and nothing is popping out at me with regards to figuring out Samuel Barron Jaques’ possible other marriage(s). But I know a few of this blog’s readers are hot on the trail of different lines of the Jaques family, so rather than take the time to dissect all the information in these additional two clippings, I am just going to post them here on the off chance they may be of use to someone. There is a lot of non-Jaques info as well (Docherty; Applegate; Wainwright; Hull; Coleman; Whitehead; Roll; Winans; Denham; Ball; Mead; Keeler;  and Sutton; Salem County Church Inscriptions for Trullender, Watson, Wood, and Woodruff), so who knows?—maybe someone will find an interesting morsel there, too.

As always, comments, corrections, additions, etc., are always welcome.

NO. 4920—FIRST SETTLERS OF PISCATAWAY AND WOODBRIDGE—JAQUES FAMILY—Continued from No. 4912 in issue of Saturday last.
Jersey_Genealogy2_date_unknown_EDJ 2b

No. 4965 JAQUES (Referring to No. 4938, by JAK, in issue of January 2, 1915)
Jersey_Genealogy_date_unknown_EDJ 1a

No. 4995—JAQUES—Referring to No. 4965, by FWG, in relation to No. 4938 of JAK)
Jersey_Genealogy_date_unknown_EDJ 3a

Categories: Angus, Jaques, Knowles, New Jersey, Newark, Essex Co., Woodbridge | Leave a comment

James Winans Angus (1810-1862) — The Early Years

James W. Angus

James W. Angus

My second great grandfather James Winans Angus was born in New York City on 10 May 1810 to carpenter Jacob Baker Angus (b. Albany, NY) and Mary Winans Angus, (b. Elizabeth, NJ). Two sisters and one brother followed: Abigail Winans Angus, b. 1812; Martha Winans Angus, b. 1818, and Job Winans Angus, b. 1821.

In 1820, the family was living at 123 Pump Street*. Pump Street has since been renamed. According to the website www.oldstreets.com, in the late 18th to early 19th centuries, Pump Street was initially a street in the Delancey Farm Grid, from the Bowery east to Division Street. About 1800 it absorbed Nicholas Street, thereby extending the name west to the present Centre Street. In 1829 Pump Street itself was merged into Walker Street. Since 1855. most of the former Pump Street has been part of Canal Street.

Of course, Lower Manhattan was a vastly different place +/- 200 years ago. If you’re familiar with Manhattan, you know that today Canal Street runs through Chinatown. The below image from 1836 shows the bustling world in which New Yorkers of that era went about their day-to-day activities.

Broadway, New-York. Showing each Building from the Hygeian Depot corner of Canal Street, to beyond Niblo's Garden. Date: 1836 Drawn & Etched by T. Hornor. Aquatinted by J. Hill. Printed by W. Neale. Published by Joseph Stanley & Co. Entered according to Act of Congress by Jos. Stanley & Co. in the Clerks Office of the Southern District of New York. January 26th, 1836.

Broadway, New-York. Showing each Building from the Hygeian Depot corner of Canal Street, to beyond Niblo’s Garden. Date: 1836; Drawn & Etched by T. Hornor. Aquatinted by J. Hill. Printed by W. Neale. Published by Joseph Stanley & Co. Entered according to Act of Congress by Jos. Stanley & Co. in the Clerks Office of the Southern District of New York. January 26th, 1836. From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York – http://collections.mcny.org/

Tragedy struck the family on 27 November 1824, when Mary died, leaving Jacob with four children aged 3-14. Jacob remarried according to family records*, although unfortunately at the time, no one saw to it to write down the name of the second wife—so her identity remains a mystery, as far as I know. When Jacob died several years later on 29 March 1828, James, 17, and his siblings went to live with their *Uncle Elias Winans, their mother Mary’s brother. Elias’ wife, Abby, likely took the leading role in looking after the children.

Street Scenes, Canal, Copy of Old Time Engraving. Date: 1910 An engraving by G. Gibson (?); subject is Canal Street, depicted when the canal still existed, descriptive caption accompanies engraving. From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York.

Street Scenes, Canal, Copy of Old Time Engraving. Date: 1910; An engraving by G. Gibson (?); subject is Canal Street, depicted when the canal still existed, descriptive caption accompanies engraving. From the Collections of the Museum of the City of New York. http://collections.mcny.org/

According to p. 6 of Harriet Stryker-Rodda’s genealogical research paper One Line of Descendants of James Angus (1751 – 1806 [grandfather of this James]):
Elias Winans was appointed “guardian of James W. Angus, minor, his father having died intestate* (Orphans Court Record Docket 2653, recorded in Guardianship Letters Book A:329, Essex
County, N. J.), but there are no court records showing that any of the other children were legally made wards of their uncle Elias.

James Angus attended elementary school in Elizabeth, N.J., where he lived with his uncle, Elias Winans, following the death of his parents. (Stryker-Rodda, p. 9) I am wondering if perhaps James went to live with Elias prior to his father’s death since he was already 17 at that time and would otherwise not have been in Elizabeth for more than his last year or two of high school. Certainly the two youngest children would have attended elementary school there, but not James.

**Tombstone inscription, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

**Tombstone inscription, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

Further down page 9, Stryker-Rodda records that On 25 April 1835 James [age 24] was working at his trade [carpenter, wood craftsman, & coach-maker] in Paterson, N. J., [Passaic Co.] where he purchased a house lot for $200 on the southeast corner of Parke Street (Essex County Deed Book Y3:38). In October of the same year he and George R. Skinner paid $1200 for a piece of land in Paterson on the west side of Union Street, 120′ x 167′(B4:280).

This was followed in November by the purchase for $550 of a house on a lot 15′ x 56′ on the west side of Marshall Street in Paterson. In May of 1836 he sold the land on Marshall Street for the same price he had paid for it (F4:53l). James Angus’ and George R. Skinner’s partnership ended about the time James married. On the 8th of February, 1839, orders were recorded for a Sheriff’s sale of their holdings in Elizabeth [Essex Co.], on the west side of Union Street, a lot 122’xl67’xl09«, which they had purchased from George W. Halsted. The sale was to satisfy debts owed to Jacob G. Crane and William Mulford. It was carried out on 3 December 1839 at Gaylord’s Hotel (Essex County Deed Book D5.-245 ff).

Men's Fashion plate,1826. Image from University of Washington Library Digital Collections http://content.lib.washington.edu (Wikimedia Commons: In public domain in US due to expired copyright)

Men’s Fashion plate,1826. Image from U. of Washington Library Digital Collections http://content.lib.washington.edu (Wikimedia: In public domain in US due to expired copyright)

It’s worth noting that the above just-mentioned happenings coincided with a major nationwide economic recession stemming from “the panic of 1837,” a financial crisis that went on to last almost a decade. The mood in the country was one of enormous pessimism. Economic policy was no doubt a hotly debated topic. Sounds strangely familiar…

James was bouncing around quite a lot back then, not surprising for a single young man in his twenties. Thanks to all that bouncing around, we are privileged to have more information about James from the publication Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election: May 26, 1840. Apparently his place of residence, and hence the legitimacy of his vote, was at issue in the 1838 NJ elections. And that hotly contested election was a really big deal at the time. For an excellent write-up on what all the fuss was about, visit this blog post on the Blue Jersey website.

Bergen, Passaic, and Union Counties, 1838. Image cropped from  David Rumsey Historical Map Collection Author: Bradford, Thomas G. Date: 1838; Short Title: New Jersey. Publisher: Weeks, Jordan & Co. Boston Publisher: Wiley and Putnam. New York (www.davidrumsey.com)

Bergen, Passaic, and Union Counties, 1838. Image cropped from David Rumsey Historical Map Collection Author: Bradford, Thomas G. Date: 1838; Short Title: New Jersey. Publisher: Weeks, Jordan & Co. Boston Publisher: Wiley and Putnam. New York (www.davidrumsey.com)

Various individuals testified about James’ vote. I’m including a map here that shows the 1838 borders of Bergen, Passaic, and Essex counties. You may find it useful to refer to as the borders have changed since then. According to Wikipedia’s entry for Essex County: In 1837, Passaic County was formed from portions of Essex and Bergen County. In 1857, Union County was created from parts of Essex County. Today Elizabeth is in Union County, but back then, it fell within Essex County. James’ 1838 vote was recorded in Elizabethtown (then part of Essex Co.).

Martin Van Buren, US President (1833-1837) Wikipedia

Martin Van Buren, US President (1833-1837) Wikipedia

From the testimony of Luke H. Higgins, we learn that James was working in Bergen Co. — either in Hoboken or Jersey City — in the summer of 1838. When Higgins challenged him for voting in Elizabethtown, James said he worked in Bergen Co., and had his washing and mending done in Elizabethtown, and considered Elizabethtown to be his residence. Higgins ascertained that James was a Whig and and that he stood in opposition to the Van Buren administration. (Many blamed Van Buren, who opted against government intervention during and after the panic of 1837, for the countries economic woes.)

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 335.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 335.

 Early Baltimore and Ohio Railroad passenger equipment of the 1830s, displayed at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. (Wikipedia: © James G. Howes)

Early Baltimore and Ohio Railroad passenger equipment of the 1830s, displayed at the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. (Wikipedia: © James G. Howes)

The second individual to testify was John Chatterton, who claimed to have known James for about 10 years. He said James was in Jersey City in 1838, working for the railroad, building cars, and that he saw James in Elizabethtown, but could not say whether James resided in Elizabethtown or not. He knew James got his washing and mending done there. He also knew of James having work in Newark as well, and knew James’ political views and that he was in the Whig party. Upon cross-examination, Chatterton said he knew Mr. Winans [Elias, I presume] was one of James’ links to Elizabethtown and that he thought James boarded with a sister [Martha (never married) or Abigail Angus Woodruff (married to Henry King Woodruff)]. Chatterton stated James had a shop in town that still had James’ sign outside of it and that the shop may have been owned jointly with Skinner [a reference to the aforementioned George R. Skinner]. Chatterton knew nothing of how James voted during the 1838 election.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 336.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 336.

The Whig Party from The Whig Almanac and Politicians Register for 1838

The Whig Party from The Whig Almanac and Politicians Register for 1838

The last person to testify was the aforementioned Jacob G. Crane, who said he believed James’ place of residence the year prior to the elections was Elizabethtown, and that James lived with his aunt [Elias’s wife Abby Winans (Elias was still alive at this point) or one of Mary Winans Angus’s sisters?]. Jacob thought James was usually in Elizabeth from Fridays through Sundays, and thought James’ carriage-making business had been up and running in Elizabethtown for two-three years before the 1838 election, but that he broke it up right before the election. Crane said James worked in Jersey City building carriages and remained residing with his aunt until he married in February 1839 [the marriage actually took place on January 26, 1839]. Then when cross-examined, Crane said James and his new wife [Wealthy Ann Jaques] lived for a time with James’ aunt, but that they then moved to Jersey City, where James’ work was. Another reference to James’ business with Skinner was made. Crane commented that he knew James had paid his taxes in Elizabethtown.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 361.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 361.

Ultimately, a vote was taken as to whether James’ vote was lawful, and indeed it was:

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 76.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), p. 76.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Publishes by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), pp. 718-719.

Testimony in the New Jersey Contested Election, May 26, 1840 (Published by US House of Representatives: 12 May 1840), pp. 718-719.

The World of Fashion, May 1838 (Wikimedia Commons - In Public Domain in US due to expired copyright)

The World of Fashion, May 1838 (Wikimedia Commons – In Public Domain in US due to expired copyright)

Well, that’s all I have for today. More on James Winans Angus in an upcoming post… As always, comments, corrections, additions are most welcome.

A side note: In my hunt for information on James, I also came across newspaper articles between 1834-1836 referring to a bill in the New Jersey legislature to allow “James Angus, of Patterson” to divorce his wife (once named as ‘Ann’ and another time as ‘Mary’). I’m sure this is a red herring, but for the sake of satisfying my curiosity, I would love to visit NJ state archives to find out what this case was about. Apparently, at that time, in certain situations, people were able to have their marriages dissolved by the legislature. In this case, the bill to dissolve this James Angus’ marriage was eventually passed on Saturday morning, January 24, 1835***.

Elias and Abby Winans' tombstone inscriptions, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

Elias and Abby Winans’ **tombstone inscriptions, 1st Presbyterian Churchyard, Elizabeth, NJ

June ?, 1843, ad in the  New York American newspaper

June ?, 1843, ad in the New York American newspaper; evidently, the family’s involvement with Crane was ongoing. (Ad courtesy of http://www.fultonhistory.com)

New-York American newspaper ad, October 2, 1841 (courtesy of www.fultonhistory.com)

New-York American newspaper ad, October 2, 1841 (courtesy of http://www.fultonhistory.com)

***************************************************************************************************************************
*ONE LINE OF DESCENDANTS OF JAMES ANGUS (1751 – 1806) including outlines of related Winans and Jaques Families of New Jersey by Harriet Stryker-Rodda, Certified Genealogist (Elizabeth, NJ, 1969) (Project commissioned by Alfred Carpenter Angus Jr., son of James Winans Angus Jr. and Anna M. Carpenter, grandson of James Winans Angus and Wealthy Ann Jaques)

**Wheeler, Wm Ogden. Inscriptions on tombstones and monuments in the burying grounds of the First Presbyterian church and St. Johns church at Elizabeth, New Jersey.1664-1892. New Haven: Press of Tuttle, Morehouse & Taylor, 1892.

***p. 228 of Minutes of Votes and Proceedings of the 59th General Assembly of the State of New Jersey, 1835
****************************************************************************************************************************

Categories: 1st Presbyterian Elizabeth NJ, Angus, Crane, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jersey City, Hudson Co., Manhattan, New York City, Newark, Essex Co., Patterson NJ, Winans, Woodruff | 2 Comments

John B. Jaques – Part IV – The Final Years

When we left off with the story of John B. Jaques (see Part III), it was 1870 and he was living in Newark with his wife Mary and sons Walter and John (Civil War veteran, former drummer boy highlighted in a recent post). John Sr. was still estranged from his father at this point, and had yet to seek help with his rehabilitation from a serious addiction to alcohol that had driven him to a life of petty crime and at least one stint in state prison.

In March of 1872, John was arrested for stealing some coats, as reported in the New York Tribune on the 28th of that month. Somewhere between then and his 1879 reunion with his father (documented in the past post, Wayward Jaques son returns home), he sought and found help to get sober and straighten out his life. He was in his late 50s by then.

New York Herald, 28 Mar 1872 (www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 28 Mar 1872 (www.fultonhistory.com)

After I read in the Oswego paper about the father-son reunion, my first thought was about whether John Jr. managed from then on to live in a permanent state of sobriety. His father died the following year; with dad gone, did John Jr. have the will and courage to continue coping with the numerous temptations that would naturally have come his way in normal, everyday life?

1880 Census Record, 12 Jun 1880

1880 Census Record, 12 Jun 1880

On 12 Jun 1880 (two months before his father Isaac’s death), John and Mary were living together alone on Court Street in Newark; the children were out of the nest, settled down, and married, and having children of their own. John reported his profession as “Tailor” but had experienced some unemployment that year as evidenced by the tick in box 14 of the record. At some point in the next six-plus years, Mary passed away (or divorced him, but I think the former is more likely). I found a marriage record showing John’s remarriage to someone named Margaret A. Wambeld, a lady some 26 years younger than he. The marriage took place in Newark on 14 September 1886. Did she help keep John on the straight and narrow, or did she serve as an enabler of his bad habits? (Or, was she into all those bad habits herself?)

Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus, widow of James W. Angus, probably circa 1890

Wealthy Ann (Jaques) Angus, widow of James W. Angus, probably circa 1890

One answer to that question came from a New York Times article published on 3 September 1892, about an Elizabeth, NJ, robbery of the Walter P. Angus home at 25 Reid Street, and I thank blog reader Mary Keenan for pointing the article out to me. John’s first name is never given, but it is crystal clear from the contents that it was he who perpetrated the crime. Walter P. Angus was one of John’s nephews, a child of John’s late sister Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus. This was the home Wealthy lived in until she died some six months earlier, so with “big sis” permanently out of the picture, little brother with the alcohol problem seized a moment when the family was on holiday in Ocean Grove (NJ) and Walter was at work in NYC to break in and rummage through the household. John walked off with roughly $200 worth of clothing and jewelry. The police were called and after a bit of discussion and investigation, it was determined that an old man named Jacques, a relative of the Angus family, who had been boarding in this city perpetrated the crime. The article went on to mention that John was wanted for a charge of forgery, having paid his latest board bill with a forged and worthless check. The search for John had thus far proven to be fruitless: They have been unable to find any trace of him, and he is supposed to have left the city. Jacques’s father many years ago was one of the largest real estate owners in the central part of the city, and one of the streets there is called after him. Jacques is supposed to be somewhere in New-York City.

So, no, sadly it appears that John fell off the wagon at some point and was engaging in the classic activities of an addict– either drinking or looking for a way to finance his next drink.

Newark Alms House on the Elizabeth/Newark line.

Newark Alms House on the Elizabeth/Newark line.

St. Michael's Hospital, 1900

St. Michael’s Hospital, 1900

Final confirmation of John’s sad demise came in the form of his death record, which I received in the mail some two months ago:  John died of stomach cancer on 19 Dec 1895, at the age of 73 (it’s rather amazing he lived that long, given his lifestyle). The death occurred at St. Michael’s Hospital in Newark, and prior to that, John had been living at the Newark Alms House (aka the poor house). According to the website The Poor House Story, Poorhouses were tax-supported residential institutions to which people were required to go if they could not support themselves. They were started as a method of providing a less expensive (to the taxpayers) alternative to what we would now days call “welfare” – what was called “outdoor relief” in those days. Evidently, Newark’s first alms house was a godforsaken place where the down-and-out and society’s deviants were dumped. The Old Newark website provides a description (click here). A glimpse of the situation for one poor soul who met his maker there in 1867 was described in this NY times article. Whether a new alms house was in existence by the mid-1890s, I don’t know. The census of 1880 gives an idea of the types of people who ended up here (visit the Newark Research website). Margaret may well have been residing there with John. I found a death record for a ‘Margaret Jaques’ for 31 December 1896 (just over a year after John’s death), and this may have been her; had she been an alcoholic, too, a death at 50 would have come as no surprise.

John B. Jaques was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ. If he was buried in his father’s plot, he is in an unmarked grave as no marker appears for him in that vicinity.

That is the extent of what I know about John B. Jaques Jr. He has numerous descendants “out there,” and I have managed to track down a few lines into the early part of last century. It still amazes me to think that John’s existence had been hidden from us until quite recently, and it took the Fulton History newspaper archives website to reveal him to me. I can now attest to the veracity of that site’s tagline: Finding the Angels & the Devils in the Family Tree since 2003!

1-John Barron Jaques b. Mar 1822, New York or New Jersey, USA, d. 19 Dec 
  1895, St. Michael's Hospital, Newark, Essex Co., NJ, bur. Evergreen Cemetery, 
  Hillside, Union, NJ
 +Mary F. Briggs b. Cir 1827, New Jersey, d. Bef 1886
|----2-Wealthy Ann Jaques b. Cir 1845, Pennsylvania, United States, d. Bef 8 
|      Mar 1918
|     +John Seaman b. Cir 1842
|    |----3-Mary Seaman 
|----2-Mary Jaques b. 1847, New Jersey
|----2-John B. Jaques Jr. b. 15 Oct 1848, Elizabeth, Twp, Essex Co., New 
|      Jersey, d. 13 Jun 1911, Newark, Essex Co., New Jersey
|     +Katherine Griffith b. Nov 1849, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|    |----3-Mary F. B. Jaques b. Sep 1871, New Jersey, d. After 1920
|    |     +Horace E. Apperson b. 1869, New Jersey, d. After 1930
|    |    |----4-Charlotte Apperson b. Jun 1894, New Jersey, d. After 1920
|    |    |----4-Apperson b. 6 Jun 1894, Newark, Essex, New Jersey
|    |----3-Isaac Jaques b. Jan 1872, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|    |     +Ida E. b. Jun 1875, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|    |    |----4-William C. Jaques b. Mar 1894, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|    |    |----4-Russell Jaques b. 13 Jul 1894, New Jersey, d. After 1920
|    |          +Edna b. Est 1899, New York
|    |         |----5-Joseph R. Jaques b. 13 May 1916, New York
|    |----3-William S. Jaques b. Aug 1874, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|    |     +Ann 
|    |----3-Ida Jaques b. Cir 1877, New Jersey, d. Bef 1900
|----2-Margaretta Jaques b. 10 Jul 1851, Newark, Essex, New Jersey
|     +Sylvanus Stansbury b. 1854, New Jersey
|    |----3-Ella May Stansbury b. 1880
|----2-Walter M. S. Jaques b. 4 Nov 1853, Newark, Essex, New Jersey
      +Anna Corigan b. Cir 1856, New Jersey, d. Bef 1900
     |----3-Jaques b. 7 Apr 1876, Newark, Essex Co., New Jersey
     |----3-Lillie B. Jaques b. Cir 1878, New Jersey, d. After 1900
     |----3-Josephine Jaques b. Jan 1880, Rhode Island
     |----3-Catherine Jaques b. 4 Sep 1885, Newark, Essex Co., New Jersey
 +Margaret A. Wambeld b. cir. 1848, d. Poss 31 December 1896
Categories: Angus, Crime & Punishment, Death Certificates, Elizabeth, Union Co., Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Jaques, Newark, Essex Co., Scandal, US Federal 1880 | Leave a comment

John B. Jaques – Part III – The 1860s and an Alias, No Less

Newark, NJ, 1874 (Source: American memory of the Library of Congress); Wikimedia Commons: Public domain - published prior to January 1, 1923

Newark, NJ, 1874 (Source: American Memory of the Library of Congress); Wikimedia Commons: Public domain – published prior to January 1, 1923

How do you spell “Aye-yai-yai-yai-yai”? I truly did an eye roll when I found out our buddy John Jaques, whose escapades have filled several blog posts already (Wayward Jaques Son Returns Home in 1879, Part I: The Early Years, and Part II: The ‘Infamous’ Brooklyn Case), had an alias. I mean, how many of us ever think of our ancestors as having aliases? (It’s hard enough trying to track them down using their real names!) Up until recently, it never entered my mind. Have you discovered any ancestors with aliases?!

I realize many people have reinvented themselves throughout history for many good and practical reasons, and that artists, writers, athletes, singers and others have stage names, pseudonyms, etc. Or maybe someone just wants to fit in; for example, Alphonse de la Flechelle’s son (also named Alphonse) may have used the alias ‘George Stanley’ to feel less foreign (although something like ‘Alfred Fletcher’ would have made more sense…). But when it comes to criminals, you just know reasons exist that are suspect to say the least.

What’s interesting, in fact, very interesting, about the case of John is that his alias matched his grandfather Samuel B. Jaques‘ middle name of ‘Barron.’ And that led me to believe that John’s middle initial ‘B’ very likely stood for ‘Barron’ as well. (Someday, we’ll figure out exactly where the Barron name* came from.) Did he resort to using Barron at the request of his Jaques relatives who must have grown very tired of the unwanted media attention and town gossip? Or did he come up with the idea on his own to spare his elderly father? At this stage, who knows? But, in a way, I was glad to discover the Barron alias, because it helps to further prove the family link between him, his father, and his grandfather.

1860 census record

1860 census record

Well, let’s dig into the 1860s to catch up with John. Last we left him it was February 1858, and he was involved in that nasty business in Brooklyn. In 1860, he was 37 years old according to the census taker and living in Newark, Essex Co., NJ, with his wife Mary (32), and four of their five children: ‘Weltheann’ (misspelling of ‘Wealthy Ann’) – age 15, Mary (13),  John Jr. (11), Margaretta (9), and Walter (6).

Below is what I managed to find for John’s activities during the 1860s, and I have no idea how comprehensive my findings are. Suffice it to say, he was continuing along the same road as before, and probably worrying his family to no end.

I found the first indication of trouble in the Newark Daily Advertiser dated Wednesday, April 16, 1862: CAUTION! The PUBLIC are hereby cautioned against paying money to, or trusting or dealing with John B. Jaques, on my account. He is not in my employ, and will never be again. ROSWELL W. HOLMES, Cheap Mammoth Clothing Store, 844 Broad st. This must have killed any business John had left at that stage…

In March of 1865 he was arrested for forgery. The Newark Daily Advertiser carried a brief paragraph on the 16th of the month: ARRESTED FOR FORGERY – A tailor named John B. Jaques, residing in Broad St., has been going around among the brewers of this city in order to obtain money. He received $12 from Messrs. Lorenz and Hensler, and gave them a due bill signed “A.C. Smith per J. Nolan.” The bill proved a forgery, and Messrs. L. & H. had the man arrested. He is now under commitment.

I found another arrest for 1865, this one in November, and this is where the alias came in. On the 15th, the Newark Daily Advertiser published: LARCENY – John B. Jaques, alias John Barron, of this city, tailor, was arrested in New York yesterday by Officer McCafferty, of the Sixth Precinct, on a charge of stealing five cloth coats from John G. McGreggor, of No. 2 Bowery. The coats had been given to the accused to make up; instead of doing so, he sold them to Thomas Walker, of No. 36 Centre street. Committed by Justice Hogan.

The next article I found was in the New York Herald, dated October 4, 1867. This time it concerned a state prison sentence of six months for false pretenses (see 2nd to the last line in the below snippet). By now, daughter Wealthy Ann was married to John Seaman (8 November 1865) so she was no longer being subjected to the day-to-day stress that comes with having an unpredictable, out-of-control father. (Her wedding announcement was in the Newark Daily Advertiser on Wednesday, 15 November of that year: SEAMAN – JAQUES – On the 8th inst., by Rev. H. C. Fish, D.D., Mr JOHN SEAMAN, and Miss WEALTHY ANN JAQUES, all of this city.)

October 4, 1867, New York Herald (www.fultonhistory.com)

October 4, 1867, New York Herald (www.fultonhistory.com)

By the end of the decade, it looks like Mary and Margaretta, who would have been about 23 and 19 by then, respectively, had flown the coop as well. According to 1870 census records, the girls were no longer in John and Mary’s household. I found evidence that Margaretta married someone with the last name of Stansbury, but have yet to look into that further.

1870 census record

1870 census record

So by 1870, the household was down to four: John (48), Mary (43), John B. Jr. (21) and Walter (16). Both boys were working in a jewelry shop, so obviously they decided to avoid their father’s and grandfather’s line of business. Who knows what John’s reputation was by now, and it’s a shame, because nearly 20 years prior, it looks like he was really wanting to make a go of the tailoring profession.

Almost 20 years prior…

John placed an ad in the Newark Daily Advertiser during the summer of 1851. The ad evolved a bit over the summer months, but here is what it said on 9 June of that year:
J. B. JAQUES would respectfully beg leave to inform his friends and the public of Newark generally, that he has located himself in Bolies’ place, the first door from the corner of Broad, under Mr. Towle’s Dry Good Store, for the purpose of conducting the Tailoring business. He is now prepared to execute all orders in his line in the best manner, most fashionable style, and on the most reasonable terms.– Having had long experience in the Cutting department, he feels assured that his customers cannot fail of being well pleased. Gentlemen wishing to furnish their own material for making up, will please call on me before purchasing. I will take great pleasure in going with them to make the selection. N. B. Repairing done with neatness and despatch. We know of no individual who can take precedence of J. B. Jaques in skill and scientific requirements.

By August 19, 1851, he had relocated to work with the man who would — 11 years later — publicly warn his fellow Newark citizens about the hazards of interacting with John:
J. B. JAQUES, TAILOR, would respectfully beg leave to inform his friends and the public of Newark generally, that he has removed to the business stand occupied by Mr. R. W. Holmes, No. 323 Broad street, below the 1st Presbyterian church, and will continue the Tailoring business there–having exclusive charge of the Custom Department. He is now prepared to execute all orders in his line in the best manner, most fashionable style, and on the most reasonable terms.– Having had long experience in the Cutting department, he feels assured that his customers cannot fail of being well pleased. Gentlemen wishing to furnish their own material for making up, will please call on me before purchasing. I will take great pleasure in going with them to make a selection. N. B. Repairing done with neatness and despatch. Cutting carefully and punctually attended to.

I’ve found nothing to suggest that John was ever responsible for any major crimes. His run-ins with the law and misguided behavior stemmed from his problems with alcohol–at least that’s what I surmise, having read the 1879 temperance column.  I feel most for John’s family who lived on tenterhooks, never knowing what he would get up to next.

There will be one more post on John, I think. And that should wrap things up.

*Re: the Barron family – from p. 61 of History First Presbyterian Church of Woodbridge, New Jersey 300th Anniversary (Carteret, NJ: Hoffman Printing Corp; 1975):  Without a shadow of doubt, one of the most interesting of the early Woodbridge families is the Barron Family. The Barrons are descended from the Palatine Barons of Burnchurch, County of Waterford. Ireland. The patronymic name of the family was FitzGerald. The last branch of the FitzGeralds, who were Barons of Burnchurch, retained for several years a station of rank and influence in Kilkenny. When they became involved in the troubles of the times they were forced to abandon their native shire and settle in the bordering county of Waterford. To escape the rancor of persecution and elude its vigilance they assumed the cognomen of Barron instead of their patronymic, FitzGerald.  The FitzGerald family can be traced back to the Battle of Hastings and William the Conqueror to the year 1066. The earliest traceable individual member is Walter FitzOtho in 1086. The first member of this family, who now called themselves the Barrons as apart from Baron, who came to America, was Ellis Barron. He came to Watertown, Massachusetts in 1640 with his first wife Grace and their five children. A grandson of Ellis, Elizeus by name, born June 4, 1672 in Groton, Massachusetts, came to Woodbridge about 1690 and was considered as among the first setlers. Elizeus had a son. Samuel, born in 1711 and who died on September 1, 1801.

Resources:
Images and information about historic Newark, NJ
Old Newark Web Group

Categories: Barron, Crime & Punishment, Jaques, Newark, Essex Co., US Federal 1860, US Federal 1870 | 2 Comments

John B. Jaques – Part II – The ‘Infamous’ Brooklyn Case

header

1856 — New York City and Environs, showing Newark, NJ, on the left & Brooklyn, NY, on the right (Map Credit: David Rumsey Historical Map Collection – details and link to full map below)

Just after the New Year in 1858, John Jaques resurfaced in the newspapers in a story that one paper referred to as ‘one of the most infamous cases ever placed on record.’ He was 34 years old, his wife Mary — in her early 30s, and their eldest child Wealthy Ann — about 13 years of age. Walter, their youngest, was about five. John’s dad, the respected Isaac Jaques of Elizabeth, NJ, was about 67 and long retired after a successful career as a Manhattan tailor and an Elizabeth, NJ, real estate investor. John’s mom (also named Wealthy Ann) had died of consumption some two years prior, in April 1856. Sometime between Wealthy’s death and the 1860 census, Isaac remarried — to Rebecca Robinson, so he could have already been married to Rebecca at the time this ‘infamous’ Brooklyn case was the talk of the town, state, and tri-state area (the story even made it into the Boston Herald and the Philadelphia Press).

As far as John’s siblings go, Wealthy Ann Jaques Angus (my 2nd great grandmother) was married to carriage maker and respected Elizabethtown businessman James Angus, Walter was a dentist, and Charles was in the process of becoming a doctor. I’m not sure about Jane, Christopher, and Isaac Jr., but (provided they were still around–and I know at least Isaac Jr. was) I suspect they were busy living respectable lives. So, John’s propensity for alcohol must have been a source of disruption and great worry for his friends and family, and the third article included in this post states just that. At some point down the road, they may well have washed their hands of him, but it appears that at this point at least some of his friends and family were standing by him. And he had not yet trashed his reputation with the community; one paper described him as ‘a man of respectable standing, except that occasionally he drinks too much.’

Brooklyn, NY, in 1868, showing location of the IX Ward (Map Credit: David Rumsey Maps -- full credit and link below)

Brooklyn, NY, in 1868, showing location of the IX Ward (Map Credit: David Rumsey Maps — full credit and link below)

But, on with the story of what happened. On the cold winter’s night of January 4, 1858, John was discovered lying unconscious and near death in a pond in Brooklyn’s 9th Ward. The incessant barking of a dog, whose master eventually came outside to see what the fuss was all about, is the only thing that saved him. Allegedly he was severely beaten and left there to die by two shady characters who were trying to prevent him from testifying at a trial taking place the next day in New Jersey. I’ll let you do your own reading of the tale as it unfolds. Suffice it to say, you’re going to get some background on John (residing in Newark, NJ, at this time) and his own recounting of the events, and you’re going to ‘hear’ courtroom testimony from John’s long-suffering wife Mary F. (Briggs) Jaques and his daughter Wealthy Ann. There are twists and turns, and things are not always what they seem. Is he a victim, or is there more to the story? The last clipping included contains the verdict which came in mid-February 1858; this clipping is a bit hard to read, so I am including a transcription of the most illegible section below it.  (As an aside, those interested in Brooklyn of that era will enjoy the website Whitman’s Brooklyn: A Virtual Visit Circa 1850) There are some views of old Brooklyn from about this period which help set the scene for this story. Worth a look, if you have time.)

Currier & Ives, View of Brooklyn, 1879 (In public domain in US - credit below)

Currier & Ives, View of Brooklyn, 1879 (In public domain in US – credit below)

Thanks to the generosity of the Fulton History website’s lack of copyright restrictions, I can post the articles here. And that’s a great thing because, just like the previous post’s article about John (the ‘Prodigal Son’ returns), these articles are (naturally) written in a way that reflects the tone of that era, something I’d find impossible to convey should I be forced to paraphrase or re-word. So enjoy the read. This post will be followed by 1-2 more as we are still in the 1850s, and John lived another 37 years. As always, comments, thoughts, corrections, and additions welcome.

Jamaica, NY, Long Island Farmer, January 7, 1858

Jamaica, NY, Long Island Farmer, January 7, 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com).

Jamaica, NY, Long Island Farmer, January 7, 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com).


The New York Evening Express, 7 Jan 1858

crime

The New York Evening Express, 7 Jan 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Times, 7 January 1858

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Herald, 8 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Herald, 8 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

crime

The- New York Times, 7 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Friday evening, 8 January 1858

Crime

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Friday evening, 8 January 1858

Trenton State Gazette (8 January 1858): Mr. John B. Jaques, of Newark, New Jersey, was found insensible in a pond in the Ninth Ward of Brooklyn, on Wednesday morning. It appears that he had been inveigled from New York by a man named Smith, the keeper of a saloon, and against whom a charge was pending for selling liquor without license, and Jaques was the principal witness for the prosecution. Arrived in Brooklyn, Smith was joined by one Myers, the keeper of a saloon on Fulton Avenue, when they robbed and threw Jaques into the pond where he was found.

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, 9 January 1858

Crime

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, 9 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Monday evening, 11 January 1858

Crime

Brooklyn, NY, Daily Eagle, Monday evening, 11 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858

Crime

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

Crime

The New York Times, Friday, 15 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

The New York Herald, 18 January 1858

Crime

The New York Herald, 18 January 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 19 February 1858

New York Herald, 19 February 1858

New York Herald, 19 February 1858 (www.fultonhistory.com)

New York Herald, 19 February 1858: …the defendants were arrested and had a partial examination before Justice Morehouse, when they waived further examination, and were committed to await the action of the Grand Jury. That body indicted  Myres and Smith for assault and battery with intent to kill, and also for highway robbery. The present trial was for assault and battery with intent to kill. The evidence of Jaques was substantially as above; that of Dr. Ball went to show the extent of the injuries which were at the time thought to be of a serious nature, although Jaques had subsequently entirely recovered from them. The witnesses for the defence went to show that Jaques could not be believed under oath, and that he had been arrested for various offences in New Jersey, and that indictments were there pending against him. They sought to prove that Myres and Smith separated from Jaques on the night of the affair, and that the injuries were the result of his falling while intoxicated. The trial was concluded yesterday  afternoon and the case given to the jury, who, after a long absence, returned a verdict of “not guilty.” The defendants were then discharged, their own recognizances being taken to appear and answer the other indictment.

Resources: Those interested in Brooklyn of that era will enjoy the website Whitman’s Brooklyn: A Virtual Visit Circa 1850.

MAP CREDITS:
David Rumsey Historical Map Collection, Full Title: Map Of The Country Thirty Three Miles Around The City Of New York. Published By J.H. Colton, No. 86 Cedar St. New York, 1853. Drawn by G.W. Colton. Engraved by J.M. Atwood, N.Y.

Full Title: Plan of New York and Brooklyn. (Atlas of New York and vicinity by F.W. Beers published by Beers, Ellis & Soule, New York, 1868)

Currier & Ives image from Eric Homberger: The Historical Atlas of New York City: A Visual Celebration of Nearly 400 Years of New York City’s History. Holt Paperbacks, 1998, page 72 (see Wikimedia Commons link) – ‘This media file is in the public domain’ in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923. See http://copyright.cornell.edu/resources/publicdomain.cfm this page for further explanation. This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States; this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, mainland China (not Hong Kong nor Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland.

Categories: Angus, Brooklyn, Crime & Punishment, Cushman, Elizabeth, Union Co., Jaques, Manhattan, New York City, Newark, Essex Co., Scandal | 2 Comments

Francis Woodruff & Ezra Ayers Families

Mary Jane Trowbridge

Mary Jane Trowbridge

Francis Woodruff

Francis Woodruff

On March 16, I posted an update on members of the Francis Woodruff family. There were four children: Emma (b. 1846), William (b. 1849), Matthias (b. 1851), and Phebe (b. 1855). You may recall that Phoebe and Matthias had married siblings from the Ezra Ayers family: Phebe married Isaac J. Ayers, and Matthias married Mary S. Ayers. I did a bit of digging on the Ayers family and emerged with the below family tree. There were nine children in all!

 1-Ezra Ayers b. Jun 1821, New Jersey 
  +Mary Ann b. Oct 1823, England
|--2-Sarah M. Ayers b. Cir 1846, d. After 1910
|--2-Isaac J. Ayers b. Jan 1848, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|   +Phebe M. Woodruff b. 11 Oct 1855, Union Twp, Essex, NJ
|  |--3-Anna W. Ayers b. Aug 1875, Newark, Essex Co., NJ
|  |--3-Charles S. Ayers b. May 1878, New Jersey
|  |--3-Amy M. Ayers b. Jul 1888, New Jersey
|  |--3-Isaac Ayers b. Abt 1880, Newark, Essex Co., NJ
|--2-Francis Ayers b. Abt 1851, d. After 1910
|--2-Mary S. Ayers b. 1853, d. After 1910
|   +Matthias Woodruff b. 1851, d. 6 Apr 1892, Chatham, Morris Co., NJ
|  |--3-Frances Woodruff b. Abt 1875, d. After 1910
|--2-Emma Ayers b. Abt 1856, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|--2-Samuel Ayers b. Abt 1858, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|--2-Joseph Ayers b. Abt 1860, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|--2-Elizabeth Ayers b. Abt 1862, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|--2-Judith Ayers b. Dec 1863, New Jersey, d. After 1910
|--2-Annie Ayers b. Abt 1866, New Jersey, d. After 1910

In August 1850, when Ezra was 29, he and his wife were living in Woodbridge, Middlesex Co., NJ, with Sarah (age 4) and Isaac (age 2). His occupation is listed as a tailor and he has declared real estate with a value of $1,200 (roughly $35,000 today). He was born in NJ, while his wife was born in England.

Trolley Cars Running Near Newark Courthouse Circa early 1900s
(Charles Cummings and John O’Connor. Newark: An American City)

I hit pay dirt with the 1870 census (both records freely available on Family Search, by the way) which shows the couple with all nine children living in the Tenth Ward of Newark, Essex Co., NJ. Isaac is 48 by now and listed as a retail grocer. His real estate is now valued at $12,000 (nearly $210,000 in today’s currency) and his personal estate at $1,500 (about $26,000 today). Wife Mary is still “keeping house” (with nine children, I can’t imagine what else she would be doing!), but now daughter Sarah (24) is a clerk in a “Fancy Store” and Isaac (22) is a “Grocers Clerk”, likely in his dad’s store. Son Francis is 19 with no occupation listed for him. In school are Mary (16), Emma (14), Joseph (10), and Elizabeth (8). Little Annie, age four, born when mother Mary was 41, is still at home. Interestingly an Isaac Jones is also in residence. He is 76 and listed as born in England, so it seems likely he is Mary’s father. The census shows that her mother was born in England as well.

Newark Public Service Terminal, 1917 View (copyright-free image)

How the Ayers and the Woodruffs became acquainted, I do not know. Francis was a farmer so perhaps he sold his produce at Ayers’s market. In any case, it was not long after this 1870 census that the two marriages–those of Matthias Woodruff to Mary S. Ayers, and Isaac J. Ayers to Phebe Woodruff–took place. Although Phebe is the younger of the two Woodruff siblings, I’ll begin with her. She (19) married Isaac Ayers (26) on October 23, 1874, in Union, NJ. A Google search on Isaac J. Ayers name revealed a website for a restaurant at 13 Waverly Place in Madison, NJ, called Poor Herbie’s. Their website information reveals that the building their restaurant is located in was operated as a grocery store by Isaac J. Ayres in 1877, the year a major fire destroyed a large commercial area. The fire allegedly began in that very building. [For an image of the building as it appears today, click here. Poor Herbie’s is on the left.] Isaac remained in the grocery business; the 1880 census lists him as a grocer in Newark, NJ.

Isaac and Phebe Ayers had four children: Anna W. (b. 1875), Charles S. (b. 1878), Amy M. (b. 1888), and Isaac Jr. (b. about 1880). Only the older three children appear in the 1900 census, so I gather Isaac Jr. must have died young. The 1900 census lists Isaac Sr. as a farmer who owned his farm free and clear. Anna (24) is not working, Charles (22) is a real estate clerk, and Amy (11) is at school. Ten years later (in 1910), the census record shows Isaac still as a farmer in Union, NJ. The record says at “Truck place”–I have no idea what that means, but he is listed as an employer. Wife Phebe and daughter Annie (34) are at home, while daughter Amy (21) is listed as a public school teacher. That is, thus far, the extent of what I know about this family.

Now, back to Matthias (b. 1851), who greatly intrigues me; he married Mary S. Ayers (b. 1853) on November 21, 1872, in Newark, Essex Co., NJ. They had a single child, a son, Frances, who was born about 1875. Matthias died on April 6, 1892, in Chatham, Morris Co., NJ, in the couple’s twentieth year of marriage. So what was going on with Matthias for those twenty years and why did he pass away relatively young? I could not find him in 1880 or 1890 census records. I did find Mary in 1900 and 1910, but, of course, by then Matthias was already long gone.

Suffrage Hikers in Newark, NJ, 1913
(copyright-free image)

In 1900, Mary (47) is back living with her elderly parents, Ezra and Mary Ann Ayers, and sister Judith E. Ayers (36). Their residence is listed as 130 Elm Street, Newark City, NJ. Ezra, 76, is listed as a dealer in dry goods, owning his own home free and clear. Mary states all 9 of her children are still living. This time she lists herself as born in England and her parents as having both been born in Wales.

Newark Paper Boys, 1909*
(Photo Credit: Shorpy website, see link to large Shorpy photo at end of post)

By 1910, Ezra must have passed away. Mary, 85, is listed as the head of the household at 130 Elm Street. Once again, she lists all nine children as still living. Matthias’s widow, Mary Ayers Woodruff (now 56, working in dry goods, store retail), is still living there, as is her son Frances, age 35, single, and a dentist. Also resident are daughter Emma J. Brown, a widow, aged 50, working as a sales woman in dry goods; daughter Judith E. Ayers (44; single, no occupation); daughter Annie M. Ayers (40; single, no occupation); and a 17-year-old servant named Helen Lannigan.

Matthias’s son Frances would have been 17 when he (Matthias) died. Perhaps Frances’s path to dentistry was owed to his great uncle John Dickinson (a dentist) who was married to Emma Woodruff (Francis Woodruff’s sister and Matthias’s aunt). What happened to Frances? I gather he never married, but who knows, maybe we will find out differently.

Dentist in His Office, Unknown Artist, American; Date: 1900s (Metropolitan Museum collections, visit http://www.metmuseum.org)

I found a death record for a Frances Woodruff born on August 18, 1874. If this was “our” Frances, he lived to the ripe old age of 93, passing away in February 1967 and last residing in Orange, Essex, New Jersey. But, I’ll need to see the death certificate to know for sure whether that’s him.

Relevant to Matthias’s whereabouts for those twenty years of marriage, I recall coming across some letters a long time ago that revealed a bit about Matthias’s relationship with his father Francis Woodruff. Matthias wrote the letters either from Wyoming or North Dakota. As I recall he talked about farming wheat. Perhaps Matthias was working land out there to support Mary and Frances, but the way he spoke in the letter, it sounded like he had a boatload of kids to support, but now I know there was just Frances. He also, as I recall, asked his dad Francis Woodruff for money. I will try to find those letters and include them in the blog.

Well, enough for today. Until next time!

*Shorpy Image: click here.

Categories: Ayers, Newark, Essex Co., US Federal 1870, US Federal 1880, US Federal 1900, US Federal 1910, Woodruff | Leave a comment

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