Last Wills and Testaments

Daniel Brodhead Jr.’s daughter, Ellen

Mt. Vernon Cemetery (image in public domain - Wikimedia Commons)

Mt. Vernon Cemetery, Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views (in public domain – Wikimedia Commons)

Ellen Brodhead was “Christian” & Daniel Brodhead Jr.‘s first child. Born in Pennsylvania in 1802, she died in Philadelphia on 17 August 1881 of a cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 79. She was buried two days later in Mt. Vernon Cemetery. At the time of her death, she had been living at 4658 Main Street in Germantown, Philadelphia.

Ellen married Michael Stroup circa 1822; their two children that I know of are listed below. :

  • Amanda Kline Stroup (b. cir. 1823) – married Christian Donat (b. 1822; d. bef. 1870) and had at least one child, a daughter named Mary (1846-1895) who went on to marry Charles D. Matlack (1843-1905).  Amanda died on 1 November 1895 and was buried in St. Thomas Episcopal Church Cemetery, Whitemarsh, Montgomery Co., PA. Daughter Mary and Charles Matlack are buried there as well. (Whitemarsh is a suburb of Philadelphia.)
  • Ellen Stroup (b. 1826) – married **Thomas Jefferson Woolf on 25 Sep 1845; they had one child — Margaret Ewing Woolf (b. 1847) who married a Mr. Hatch.  Ellen Stroup Woolf was buried in Monument Cemetery, Philadelphia. Her husband Thomas went on to marry one of Ellen’s cousins, **Julia Brodhead Cobb (daughter of Mira Brodhead and William Cobb), on 9 March 1857. Thomas and Julia are buried in Mt. Vernon Cemetery. A son named Clifford (b. 1859), who died of pulmonary consumption at age 16, is also buried at Mt. Vernon.

Michael Stroup likely passed away prior to 1850 since, according to census records, that year Ellen was living with her daughter Amanda Donat & family in Spring Garden, Ward 3, Philadelphia. Unfortunately, Ellen’s marital status is not given.

Christian Donat M 28 Pennsylvania
Amanda Donat F 26 Pennsylvania
Mary Donat F 4 Pennsylvania
Joseph Mahenacke M 24 Pennsylvania
William La Mintzer M 32 Pennsylvania
Ellen Stroup F 46 Pennsylvania

The 1860 and 1870 census records* show an Ellen Stroup (of the right age) living in Hoboken, Weehawken Co., NJ, and working as a housekeeper in the two households. I don’t know why Ellen would have left Phila. for a housekeeping job in Hoboken.

View looking down the Schuylkill River from Laurel Hill cemetery near Philadelphia, Pa, from Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views (in public domain - Wikimedia Commons)

View looking down the Schuylkill River from Laurel Hill cemetery near Philadelphia, Pa, from Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views (in public domain – Wikimedia Commons)

In 1880, at age 76,  she was back in Philadelphia, living on Germantown Avenue with the Joseph Budd family, according to US Census records found on Ancestry.com. At this point she is listed as a widow. Her relationship to the Budds is not given. Joseph Budd was listed as a bookkeeper and Ellen Budd as keeping house.

Self Joseph Budd M 60 Pennsylvania, United States
Wife Ellen Budd F 56 Pennsylvania, United States
Daughter Julia Budd F 28 Pennsylvania, United States
Son Charles Budd M 25 Pennsylvania, United States
Other Ellen Stroup F 76 Pennsylvania, United States

Since 1st daughter Ellen Stroup Woolf died in 1852, this Ellen Budd could not have been Ellen Brodhead Stroup’s daughter as I have seen claimed in message boards on the topic. But Ellen Budd must have been someone important to Ellen Stroup since Ellen Budd is listed as a beneficiary in Ellen Stroup’s will* dated 20 March 1873 and proved on 6 September 1881 in Philadelphia.

Laurel Hill Cemetery, stereoscopic views (in public domain - Wikimedia Commons)

Laurel Hill Cemetery, Robert N. Dennis collection of stereoscopic views (in public domain – Wikimedia Commons)

Interestingly, Ellen B. Budd and Joseph Budd are buried next to Ellen Brodhead Stroup’s sister Juliana Brodhead Mintzer and Juliana’s husband Adam in Laurel Hill Cemetery, Philadelphia, which is just across the road from Mt. Vernon Cemetery, resting place for Ellen Brodhead Stroup and her niece Julia Cobb Woolf & husband Thomas J. Woolf.

So who was Ellen Budd? That’s the question. If you know or have a theory, please share!

More on other Daniel Brodhead Jr. offspring in an upcoming post.

1-Capt Daniel Brodhead Jr b. 1756, d. 2 Feb 1831, Philadelphia, PA
 +Christian Abel b. Poss. 1783, d. Prob. bef. 1820
|----2-Ellen Brodhead b. Cir 1802, Pennsylvania, United States, d. 17 Aug 1881, 
|      Philadelphia, PA, bur. 19 Aug 1881, Mt. Vernon Cemetery, Philadelphia, 
|      Philadelphia Co., PA
|     +Michael Stroup d. Bef 1850
|    |----3-Amanda Kline Stroup b. Cir 1823, Philadelphia, PA, d. 1 Nov 1895, 
|    |      Pennsylvania, United States, bur. St. Thomas Episcopal Church 
|    |      Cemetery, Whitemarsh, Montgomery Co., PA
|    |     +Christian Donat b. 1822, d. Bef 1870
|    |    |----4-Mary Donat b. 1846, Pennsylvania, United States, d. 15 Mar 
|    |    |      1895, Pennsylvania, United States, bur. St. Thomas Episcopal 
|    |    |      Church Cemetery, Whitemarsh, Montgomery Co., PA
|    |          +Charles D. Matlack b. 23 May 1843, d. 16 Feb 1905, bur. St. 
|    |           Thomas Episcopal Church Cem., Whitemarsh, Montgomery Co., PA 
|    |         |----5-Elwood Matlack b. Cir 1866
|    |----3-Ellen Stroup b. 23 Feb 1826, Pennsylvania, United States, d. 27 Nov 
|    |      1852, Philadelphia, PA, bur. Monument Cemetery, Philadelphia, PA
|          +Thomas Jefferson Woolf b. 28 Apr 1823, Philadelphia, PA, c. 8 Mar 
|           1850, St. Jude's Church, Philadelphia, PA, d. 15 Feb 1904, 
|           Philadelphia, PA, bur. 18 Feb 1904, Mt. Vernon Cemetery, 
|           Philadelphia, Philadelphia Co., PA
|         |----4-Margaret Ewing Woolf b. 1847
|               +Hatch

Source:

*Research done by Diana Gail Matthieson and posted on Diana, Goddess of the Hunt — for Ancestors!
**Harper-Banta Tree on Ancestry.com – shows original marriage records for the two Thomas Woolf marriages.
Ellen Stroup on Find a Grave

Categories: Brodhead, Death Certificates, Donat, Last Wills and Testaments, Laurel Hill Cemetery Phila PA, Mintzer, Monument Cemetery Phila PA, Mt. Vernon Cemetery Phila PA, Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, St. Thos Episc Church Cem Whitemarsh PA, Stroup, US Federal 1850, US Federal 1860, US Federal 1870, US Federal 1880, Woolf | Leave a comment

Thomas Trewin of Woolwich, Co. Kent — Last Will & Testament (22 June 1854)

Almost a year ago, I mentioned finding the will of Thomas Trewin online via Discovery at the UK National Archives. You can find that post here. I believe I paid about $10 to download it. Well, I finally got around to deciphering it, sadly not in its entirety, but I think I ‘got’ most of it; the handwriting is difficult to read and the bottom portion is somewhat smudged. I’ll keep taking a stab at figuring out the bits left blank so hopefully at some point they’ll all get filled in.

I’m not allowed to publish the original document so here is my transcription. Feel free to offer corrections. Update 11/2/13: Thanks to Pat Trewin for filling in the blanks of my original transcription.

Google Maps’ link to 27 Joseph Street

Will retrieved from Discovery, UK National Archives online. Transcribed and published in this blog with permission of PJ/UK National Archives

Will retrieved from Discovery, UK National Archives online. Transcribed and published in this blog with permission of PJ/UK National Archives

Categories: Last Wills and Testaments, Plumstead Greater London, Trewin, Woolwich, Greater London | 2 Comments

David Wait Family of Perth Amboy, NJ: David Wait’s 1810 Will

City of Perth Amboy, 1823

Perth Amboy Presbyterian Church

Last year I wrote a couple of posts about the David Wait family of Perth Amboy, NJ. This past weekend, I came across details from David Wait’s will dated October 29, 1810, written 14 days before his death at age 56. As you may recall, David was a carpenter and was involved in the construction of Perth Amboy’s first Presbyterian Church. To read the previous posts about David and his family, click on Oct. 5 & 7, 2011, in the calendar/archives on the left side of this blog.

David’s immediate family tree looks like this:
1-David Wait b. 20 May 1754, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland, d. 11 Nov 1810, Perth Amboy, Middlesex Co., NJ
+Irene Bell b. 20 Oct 1764, CT, d. 31 May 1804, Perth Amboy, NJ
|–2-David Wait b. 15 Jan 1785, Perth Amboy, NJ, d. 7 Nov 1825
|–2-John Oliver Wait b. 10 Jan 1787, Perth Amboy, NJ, d. 23 Nov. 1876, Perth Amboy, Middlesex Co., NJ
|–2-Isaac Wait b. 26 Apr 1788, Perth Amboy, NJ, d. 25 Jun 1815
|–2-Margaret Wait b. 9 Jun 1790, Perth Amboy, NJ, d. 4 Jun 1837
|–2-Joseph Thompson Wait b. 13 Oct 1791, Perth Amboy, NJ, d. 12 Feb 1854
|–2-Kathrine (Catherine) Wait b. 18 May 1793, Perth Amboy, NJ, d. 25 Jan 1813
|–2-Agnes Wait b. 16 Oct 1794, Perth Amboy, NJ, d. 24 Mar 1859
|–2-James Wait b. 31 Jul 1796, Perth Amboy, NJ, d. 31 Dec 1800
|–2-Sarah Matilda Wait b. 31 Mar 1798, Perth Amboy, NJ, d. 21 Jun 1818
|–2-William Elias Riggs Wait b. 3 Jun 1800, Perth Amboy, NJ
|–2-Phillip Kearny Wait b. 30 Sep 1801, Perth Amboy, NJ, d. 25 Feb 1843, Savannah, GA

When the will was written, David’s wife Irene was deceased, having passed away six years previously at age 39, and the children ranged in age from 9-23. The eldest, David and John, were bequeathed all the tools and implements of my trade to be equally divided between them according to their value.(John is the son from whom I am descended).

Brindle cow
PHOTO BY Christian Bickel, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Germany

Daughter, Margaret, my brindle cow, bed, bedding, 2 chairs, 1 chest, 4 looking glasses (one of which is in trust for each of her sisters, Catherine, Agnes, and Sarah). Said daughter, Margaret, the house and lot in Perth Amboy, which I bought of the late Sophia Terrill, to be occupied by her as a home for herself and all of my younger children, to wit, Joseph, Catherine, Agnes, Sarah, William, and Phillip, until they reach age 21 or are married; and when youngest is 21, executors to dispose of said house and lot, and proceeds to be divided between children, or their heirs, equally. Executors to hold in trust the new house and lots belonging thereunto (in which I now live), to rent or to be sold and profits or proceeds used for support and education of my children.

English flintlock blunderbuss (Image in public domain. See http://www.nps.gov/history/museum/exhibits/revwar/image_gal/morrimg/blunderbuss.html)

All residue of estate to be divided equally between said children when youngest is 21. Executors–sons, David, John, and Isaac. Witnesses–Andrew Bell, Jas. Edgar, Jr., Lewis Arnold. Proved December 11, 1810. 1812, Jan. 18. Inventory [not totaled]; made by James Harriot, Thomas Griggs. Lists “one uniform Coat, Vest & Boots,” spy glass, case of drawing instruments, lot of architect books, other books, one blunderbuss. (NEW JERSEY, ABSTRACT OF WILLS, 1670-1817, FILE 10279 L; viewable in book Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Volume XII, 1810-1813, page 409)

Daughter Margaret certainly had her work cut out for her, but she had probably already been raising her younger siblings for some time given the tragic loss of mother Irene (Bell) Wait some years prior. One name here that stands out in particular is that of witness Andrew Bell. This may have been a brother of Irene’s. Irene’s ancestors have been a mystery to me so far, so maybe I can find something out by researching Andrew. Hopefully this is a promising clue!

Categories: Last Wills and Testaments, Lewis, Martin, Perth Amboy, Presbyterian, Revolutionary War, Wait | Leave a comment

George Wills (b. 1793): Last Will and Testament

Image from private family archives. George Wills original portrait was inherited by his daughter Martha according to the will

Image from private family archives. George Wills original portrait was inherited by his daughter Martha according to the will

Thanks to Tim Laker, a George Wills descendant, for discovering George’s Last Will and Testament on file at the UK National Archives. It dates back to July 1857 and was proved in London on November 14, 1857. Among other things, this document reveals what happened to George’s business when he passed away. My past posts on the matter had been inconclusive, but here we find out for certain that George did indeed split his business between his son Jabez and his son-in-law William Slaymaker. (William Slaymaker was married to George’s daughter Mary. William and Mary Slaymaker changed their surname to Sargent before immigrating to the US in 1870.)

Son-in-law William Slaymaker inherited George Wills' business in Northampton

Son-in-law William Slaymaker inherited George Wills’ business in Northampton

Jabez inherited George’s business in Wolverton, while William inherited George’s business in Northampton. The will is very difficult to read, but here is what I have gleaned so far. Dots indicate text I was unable to decipher and in many cases I have made a “best guess”:

This the Last Will and Testament of one George Wills of Northampton in the County of Northampton Mason made this second day of July in the year one thousand eight hundred and fifty seven in the following … viz … I will that all my just debts be payed and my burial expenses be paid … I give and … to my son Jabez Wills my house and premises at Wolverton in the County of Buckingham. I give and bequeath my business at Northampton house yard and premises to to my son-in-law William Slaymaker. I give and bequeath to my daughter Mrs. Phoebe Simpson of Roade in the said County one Cottage. I give and it bequeath to my Daughter Martha Capon Gasgoine [spelling?] of …. in the County of Warwick one Cottage, also I give and bequeath her my portrait (viz/ the said Martha Capon Gasgoine [spelling?]). I give and bequeath to my late Daughter Ann ??’s [Spelling of married name hard to decipher; I’d always thought it was “Grear,” but this looks different] four children one Cottage. I give and bequeath to my Granddaughter Zillah Simpson one Cottage. The Cottages are situated in what is … St. Siz [?] Street Northampton. I will that the whole of my … debts and …. be sold and the money be applied for payments of my … at my … I will that the Bibel presented to me by the ……….. of Ashton in the said County be given to William Slaymaker. Lastly I make and constitute and appoint my …. Mr. George Wills of Broad Lane Northampton Builder and my daughter Phoebe Simpson of Roade in the County as … my Executor and Executrix of this my last Will and Testament and I hereby empower them to collect all monies due to me in … bills or otherwise at my … and to retain and pay themselves all that is due to them and all expenses related to their said Trust in which hereof I have hereunto set my hand this day and year first as above written ——–GEORGE WILLS —-Signed sealed published and delivered by the herewith Testator as and for this his Will and Testament in the presents of us who at his request and in his presents and in the presents of oath and oath other have have subscribed our names as witnesses hereto————Witness Samuel Pasenall —— John Parbery

PROVED at London 14th Nov. 1857 before the Judge by the Oath of George Wills and Phoebe (in the appointment written Phoeby Simpson, Widow, the Daughter, the Executors to whom …. was granted to having been first sworn by common duty to administer

Phoebe Wills Simpson, co-executor of George's will

Phoebe Wills Simpson, co-executor of George’s will

Zillah Simpson (1843 - 1920), George Wills' granddaughter

Zillah Simpson (1843 – 1920), George Wills’ granddaughter


Yew Tree Cottage, Roade, Northamptonshire--home of Zillah Simpson circa 1910; presumably inherited from her mother Phoebe, who presumably inherited it from her father George Wills

Yew Tree Cottage, Roade, Northamptonshire–home of Zillah Simpson circa 1910; presumably inherited from her mother Phoebe, who presumably inherited it from her father George Wills

The will leaves me with some questions and general thoughts:

  • I’d always had George’s year of death listed as 1856, but obviously it was 1857.
  • My date of death of daughter Ann Gadsden Wills Grear [last name correct?] must also be wrong (d. 1 Nov 1858); she obviously predeceased her father George.
  • Daughter Martha Capon inherited George’s portrait. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to see a photo of the full-color original? Of course, it’s fantastic to at least have the version in tones of gray; I don’t have any information on Martha’s descendants, and perhaps one of them still has this portrait. Maybe they will find us through this blog someday.
  • William Slaymaker is mentioned as inheriting a Bible. I have no idea what happened to that Bible. If it was taken to America when the family relocated, it must have ended up with someone other than daughter Elizabeth, my great grandmother; we’ve never seen it or heard of it prior to this.
  • Lastly and most interestingly, who is this George Wills the executor? I can’t make out the word before his name. George had a son on 10 Mar 1827 who was named George Sampson Wills. Our records always showed that this son died the following year, but perhaps not. Any thoughts on whether this was indeed George’s son, George?

I’ll close for now, but please feel free to share your ideas and knowledge on any of the above! Many heads are definitely better than one!

Categories: Capon, England, Gadsden, Gasgoine, Last Wills and Testaments, Northampton, Northamptonshire, Roade, Northants, Sargent, Simpson, Slaymaker, Wills, Wolverton, Buckinghamshire | Leave a comment

Thomas & Sarah Trewin Family of Woolwich, Co. Kent, England

I was excited to discover that the June 22, 1854, will of Thomas Trewin (the elder) is available online through the UK National Archives.

The document is very difficult to read but so far I have been able to make out the names of three sons—William, Thomas (my ancestor who immigrated to the US with wife Mary Anne Phillips and children in 1857), and John. The fact that a William was listed seems to confirm a previous post’s suspicions that the William Trewin born in Gosport, Hampshire, to a Thomas and Sarah Trewin and christened at the Wesleyan Church there, was indeed the William of this family. Previous research I did showed that Thomas and Sarah had four children who died as infants: two sons, John (the 1st) and Joseph, and two daughters, Mary and Sarah, and that all fits with the three brothers being the sole surviving heirs:

  • William Trewin  b. 23 Jan 1812, c. 23 Feb 1812, Wesleyan Church, Middle Street, Gosport, Hampshire, England
  • Thomas J. Trewin b. 12 Aug 1817, Woolwich, Kent, England, c. 7 Sep 1817,  Wesleyan Methodist Church, William St, Woolwich, Kent, England, d. 19 Sep 1875, Elizabeth, Union, NJ, bur. 22 Sep 1875, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, Union, NJ
  • John Trewin b. 17 Aug 1827, c. 14 Aug 1831, Wesleyan Methodist Church, William St, Woolwich, Kent, England

Section of an 1832 map* of London; see Woolwich & Plumstead on the right, well beyond what were then the borders of the city and surrounded by marshes and fields. You can see the Tower of London along the river (upper left corner).

Age-wise they would have been 42, 38, and 26 when the will was drawn up. The document was proved several years later on 12 November 1857. By then the “boys” would have been 45, 40, and 30.  Thomas would have left for Quebec City, Canada, on the ship Ion, with his family some four months prior to that, in July 1857 (they later relocated to Jersey City, NJ. See previous posts for details on the circumstances and journey). I have yet to see mention made in the will of Thomas Sr.’s wife Sarah. It seems likely she predeceased him.

In any case, I am going to try to transcribe the will for posting here. It mentions properties in Plumstead and Woolwich (neighboring areas) and a gift to the Wesleyan Methodist Chapel in Woolwich. It will take some head-scratching, but I will do my best to decipher it.

I would love to know what brought Thomas Sr. and Sarah from Gosport to Woolwich; I presume it was work-related–perhaps to work at the Royal Arsenal or to help build the Wesleyan Chapel in Woolwich. I’d also love to know what  happened to William and John, whether they remained in the Woolwich area, moved elsewhere, or also emigrated to North America.  Are there any descendants out there?

So there is plenty more to learn, but the will provides wonderful new evidence of their lives in Woolwich. Stay tuned…

SEE FOLLOW-UP POST: https://chipsofftheoldblock.wordpress.com/2013/05/13/thomas-trewin-will/

*Map is in the public domain and available for sharing for non-commercial purposes under Creative Commons.

Categories: Death, Evergreen Cemetery, Hillside, NJ, Gosport, Hampshire, Jersey City, Hudson Co., Last Wills and Testaments, Quebec City, Quebec, The Ion, Trewin, Wesleyan Methodist, Woolwich, Greater London | 4 Comments

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