Linderman

Linderman children info updated; October 1889: Albert Brodhead Linderman returns from quick trip to London and Paris

Sinking of the Cunrad Line's steamer SS Oregon, 14th march 1886, 15 miles off Long Island.

Sinking of the Cunard Line’s steamer SS Oregon, 14th march 1886, 15 miles off Long Island. Nathaniel Currier & James Meritt Ives, 1886 (Wikimedia Commons – Image in public domain in US due to publication in the US prior to 1923.)

One of this blog’s readers, Steve, is actively engaged in researching his wife’s Linderman & Brodhead ancestors. He recently emailed me some Linderman tree info I was lacking in my post on Rachael Brodhead, wife of John Jordan Linderman. To view that post, click here. Scroll down and you will find Steve’s tree showing the seven children of John and Rachael. Anyone with additional info to share, please, by all means, leave a comment.

Port Jervis Evening Gazette, 9 October 1889 (Credit: Fultonhistory.org)

Port Jervis Evening Gazette, 9 October 1889 (Credit: Fultonhistory.org)

Coincidentally I came upon an October 1889 article about one of the children, Albert Brodhead Linderman, who’d have been about 57 at the time of publication. It’s a brief article but is packed with interesting little details. Albert was just returned from a brief trip to London and Paris, and seems to have been heavily involved in the railway industry. He was described as “a great traveler and a great talker” (the gift of gab always seems to go to at least one member of a family!) and a survivor of an 1886 ship collision off the coast of Long Island, New York. I can imagine that that disaster, only three years in the past, was still very fresh in people’s minds. For a description of the fate of the luxurious 650-passenger SS Oregon whose last journey was from Liverpool, England, to New York, click here. Thankfully, all of the Oregon‘s passengers were rescued.

Yes, Albert definitely got around. Upon further investigation, I found evidence (see article on the right) of his plan to purchase the island of Cuba (!) and his involvement in draining Lake Okeechobee here in South Florida to make way for agricultural expansion:

The State authorities of Florida have entered into a contract with I Coryell of Jacksonville and A B Linderman representing capitalists of Philadelphia and San Francisco to drain Lake Okeechobee in Southern Florida. The scheme if successfully carried out will reclaim millions of acres of excellent sugar lands and result not only in the reclamation of the bed of the lake itself but it is believed in that of the two vast swamps known as the Everglades and the Big Cypress which lie south of the lake and cover the greater portion of the lower end of the peninsula. The Everglades is sixty miles in length and about the same width really constitute a vast lake from one to six in depth studded with thousands of small islands. (From The Friend, Volumes 54-55, The Society of Friends, pub. 1881)

To my knowledge, the lake—the seventh largest freshwater lake in the US—was never drained, however, due to devastation and loss of life in the 1920s as a result of some hurricanes crossing over the lake and creating a storm surge, a dike was built around the lake in the 1930s. I remember setting off with my husband to the east coast 8-9 years ago and deciding to travel in such a way as to travel along the west and north sides of the lake on our trip east and then drive along the east and south sides on our return. We’d no idea the dike existed and were expecting to see some scenic views of the lake on our journey. Boy, were we disappointed for there really were very few places to catch a glimpse of it. You have to climb up to the top of the dike to see down below. A 109-mile walking/cycling trail—the Lake Okeechobee Scenic Trail—goes around the perimeter of the lake, often on top of the dike, but you are fully exposed to the sun, something to take into consideration especially at the hottest time of year. One of the best viewing spots we found was in the town of Pahokee (with a name like that, you just have to stop to be able to say you have been there), but that is not saying too much since it’s not like you’re climbing up to any great elevation.

The fishing in the lake is supposed to be very good, and it seemed like every home along the water’s edge had a boat, but, of course, there are lots of gators in there too. We were in Boston several months after that trip and were chatting over a B&B breakfast with some German tourists who were heading down to Miami the following day. One of their top priorities was going to be to go off to swim in Lake Okeechobee. We nearly choked on our French toast, and once the powdered sugar dislodged from our throats, strongly advised them against that idea!!!

Anyway, I have gotten way off track… Back to Albert. I don’t know why he is called Colonel. Had he served in the Civil War? Anyone with some thoughts on that or anything else to do with the Linderman children, feel free to comment below. Have a good day, all.
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Update 7/5/16 – Some additional information kindly provided by aforementioned researcher Steve Hatchett:

  • Albert Brodhead Linderman patent1882 patent
  • Article on land deal in Florida involving Linderman and prominent men from Great Britain
  • Part owner of a business enterprise with brother HR Linderman – for the link, click here
  • Chester A. Arthur, 21st President of the United States of America

    Chester A. Arthur, 21st President of the United States of America – Public Domain image

  • Linderman meets President Chester A. Arthur Google Books link – Eve Bacon writes in Orlando: A Centennial History that when Arthur’s train reached Kissimmee, Colonel A.B. Linderman greeted the President and announced, “We flatter ourselves that we have among us not only the president, but the next president.” Arthur, in no mood to make a politcal address, answered, “We are not here to look after the next president. We are here for rest and quiet,” Bacon writes.
  • Hamilton Diston - Image in public domain - Florida Memory Archives call number Rc02832

    Hamilton Diston – Image in public domain – Florida Memory Archives call number Rc02832

  • Although Linderman is not mentioned by name, this Wikipedia article about Linderman’s associate, Hamilton Disston details some of the dealings in which Linderman was involved in Florida. AB Linderman was an agent and business associate of Hamilton Disston. Disston’s agents arranged the purchase of something like 4 million acres in Florida, one of the largest private land purchases at the time. This was related to the draining projects. Disston sold some of the land to Sir Edward James Reed of Great Britain. One of the articles above mentions Linderman involved in land deal with prominent Great Britain people including another Sir that was also an M.P. Reading some of the news articles about the draining made it sound like a flakey thing, but Disston was the real deal, and was moving and shaking in Florida. Note in the Wikipedia article the mention of President Arthur going to Kissimmee. That seems directly tied to the mention above of Linderman meeting Arthur in Kissimme.
  • H.R. Linderman, sometime between 1865-1880. Library of Congress image - No known restrictions on publication

    H.R. Linderman, sometime between 1865-1880. Library of Congress image – No known restrictions on publication

  • There is also a US Mint pamphlet that mentions him helping the Mint in reviewing contract bids during Henry Richard Linderman‘s term there. So ABL had his fingers in a lot of things.
  • Categories: Brodhead, Hamilton Disston, Linderman, President C. Arthur | Tags: , | 6 Comments

    Garret Brodhead’s “Wheat Plains” farmhouse—an August clean-up project. Come join the fun!

    “Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

    Hear Ye, Hear Ye! The DePuy/Brodhead Family Association is having its annual reunion in the Dingmans Ferry, PA, area on Saturday, August 15, 2015. The actual location of the meeting place is still to be determined. For details, contact the Association at 6566 Skywae Drive, Columbus, Ohio 43229, and/or join the DePuy/Brodhead Family Association “Facebook” group page where you can keep abreast of all Brodhead (and DePuy) reunion developments!

    Wheat Plains farmhouse clean-up opportunity!: On Friday, August 14, those who are interested in volunteering with the Wheat Plains Farmhouse clean-up project are welcome to join in. You may contact James Brodhead at “jbbrodheadfamily at hotmail dot com” to have a volunteer form sent to you. The Parks Department (“Wheat Plains” falls within the National Park Service system) would like to have these forms in hand at least four weeks prior to the work date.

    According to Barbara and James Brodhead, who have undertaken the cleanup of the nearby Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery in recent years and are spearheading this year’s “Wheat Plains” clean-up effort: “More specific times and locations will be forthcoming. All efforts are greatly appreciated. Please note that we are organizing a tour of the Farm House on Saturday the 15th for all those who attend the Reunion.”

    Come enjoy a fun weekend of connecting with family near and far, and giving Garret Brodhead’s homestead a much-needed makeover!

    Categories: Brodhead, Dingmans Ferry, Linderman, Monroe Co., Pennsylvania, Pike Co., Stroudsburg | 10 Comments

    Traces of Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead & wife Cornelia M. Ely

    Over the years, I’ve been trying to connect the dots on Find a Grave, linking relatives together. Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead, brother of my 2nd great-grandfather Andrew Jackson Brodhead, about whom I know very little, has long eluded me. But, I just discovered his and his wife’s graves on the Find a Grave site, and with the permission of ‘Nashvillerambler’, I am publishing the images here. The graves are located in Mountain Grove Cemetery & Mausoleum, Bridgeport, Fairfield Co., CT.

    I’ve put in a request to have Abram linked to his parents Garret Brodhead and Cornelia Dingman Brodhead. Just goes to show what a wonderful gift Find a Grave can be when searching for one’s ancestors!

    Abram and Cornelia married in 1863 when she was about 21 and he was 39. A daughter Jennie Seymour Brodhead was born later that year. Cornelia died the following year, and I believe Abram remained a bachelor for the rest of his days. Daughter Jennie married into the Linderman family, making her a direct descendant of Richard Brodhead (b. 1771) and Hannah Drake (b. 1769) along two Brodhead family lines.

    Brodhead_graves

    Abram C Brodhead grave in Mountain Grove Cemetery and Mausoleum in Bridgeport, CT (PHOTO PERMISSION: Find a Grave’s ‘Nashvillerambler’)

    Brodhead graves

    Cornelia M. (Ely) Brodhead grave in Mountain Grove Cemetery and Mausoleum in Bridgeport, CT (PHOTO PERMISSION: Find a Grave’s ‘Nashvillerambler’)

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    Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

    Parents: Garret Brodhead (1793-1872), son of Richard Brodhead (1771-1843) & Hannah Drake (1769-1832)

    Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

    Parents: Cornelia Dingman Brodhead (1797-1885), daughter of Daniel Westbrook Dingman (1774-1862) and Mary Westbrook (1774-1851)

    Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait

    Brother: Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait from 1905’s Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Personal Memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, PA (p. 260)

    Andrew Jackson Brodhead

    Brother: Andrew Jackson Brodhead, my 2nd great-grandfather

     

    Categories: Brodhead, Linderman, Mountain Grove Cemetery & Mausoleum Bridgeport CT | 8 Comments

    The Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery: Descendants work on clean up and restoration

    This post is devoted to Part II of the cemetery restoration efforts undertaken by James & Barbara Brodhead over recent summers; although they live in Washington State–far from their ancestral roots in Pennsylvania–they have made it their mission to see to it that broken and downed stones of Brodhead family ancestors receive the care and respectful restoration they deserve. As you may recall, the first post was devoted to the repair of Cornelia Dingman Brodhead’s gravestone in the Mauch Chunk Cemetery in Jim Thorpe, PA.

    This post focuses on their work in the Brodhead & Linderman Cemetery, part of the Brodhead-Courtright Farm Burial Ground, which is very much off the beaten path, within the territory of what once was Wheat Plains farm. The farm was established by Garret and Jane Brodhead after the Revolutionary War, and here in the Brodhead & Linderman Cemetery lie Richard Brodhead (Garret & Jane’s 3rd son) and his wife Hannah Drake. They and their family members resided in the Wheat Plains house for many years. So, once again, without further ado, here is a description of Barbara and James’ efforts in James’ own words (apart from a few spots where I have left clarifying notes in [brackets]; also, please click on images to see enlarged versions–the tile mosaics can be viewed as slideshows):

    "Wheat Plains"

    “Wheat Plains,” the old Brodhead Homestead, Pike Co., Pennsylvania

    Lt Garret Brodhead served in the Continental Army and as part of his “bounty” for service he was given a land grant along the Delaware River near present-day Dingman’s Ferry. The farm he established in the 1770s was named Wheat Plains. The farm remained in the Brodhead family until 1865 and then it was purchased back by Robert Packer Brodhead in 1894. Robert’s family held the land until the Federal Government took (some say stole) the land under eminent domain in preparation to build the Tocks Island Dam in the 1970s. The dam was supposed to control the occasional floods [One terrible flood occurred in 1955 with the tail end of Hurricane Diane, killing 75 in the Brodhead Valley, alone], but for several reasons the dam was not built. The lands were not returned to the owners. Many of the homes, farms, and hotels were demolished because of squatters (hippies) living in the then empty buildings. When the project was cancelled the land was turned over to the National Park Service.

    The sad state of the Wheat Plains house

    The sad state of the Wheat Plains house, 2013

    The house at Wheat Plains is one of the few remaining homes in the area. Unfortunately the National Park Service is not maintaining the home and it is destined to be destroyed when it is deemed unsafe. Parts of the original log home are integral to the structure. Garret’s son Richard owned and lived in the home for many years.

    Wheat Plains house exterior, 2013

    Wheat Plains house exterior, 2013

    Across the road and on a rise between the fields and the river lies the Brodhead & Linderman Cemetery. The family plot contains the headstones of Richard (d. 1843) and Hannah (d. 1831). Their son Richard (1st of 2 sons named Richard, d. 1809 @ 2½ yrs. old) and his sister Eliza (d. 1814 @ 10 months old) are also buried there. There is a wrought iron fence with a gate surrounding the plot. “Brodhead & Linderman” is cast into the gate. It is unknown who put up the fence and Hannah’s current headstone, but the inscription on the back states “This sacred memorial erected March 2nd 1869”. Richard and Hannah’s daughter Rachael married Dr. John Linderman. It is logical that the Lindermans were the benefactors. [John purchased the Van Gordon property, adjacent to Wheat Farms, after he got his medical license, and built a house on it in 1817 — see past post].

    A foot stone, as found

    A foot stone, as found

    There are several other stones other than the foot stones, but no marking can be discerned. The plot is too small for many more internments so there was probably no plan for the Linderman family to bury others there.  Next to the family plot on the road side of the hill are buried Van Gordens and others. Moses Van Gorden married Charlotte Newman Easton following the death of her husband Calvin Easton. It is not known how this Moses is related to those interned there. The Moses here may be the father of Charlotte’s husband, Moses. Calvin and Charlotte Easton are the parents of Ophelia Easton who married Richard and Hannah’s grandson Andrew Jackson Brodhead.

    We have made two trips to the area. The first was in 2011 and then again in 2013.

    Summer 2011

    In 2011, we met Leroy and Bobby Cron, longtime residents of Dingman’s Ferry and members of the Dingman’s Ferry and Delaware Township Historical Society. We had sent a letter to the Society and asked for family information. Leroy took us down an access road next to a corn field. He pointed into the woods and stated that the cemetery was in there. He was correct, but nothing was visible from that vantage point.

    The cemetery in 2011, as found

    The cemetery in 2011, as found

    The next day we met with a park ranger who helped us find the cemetery, and using his skills as a former surveyor, he looked at the Park Service map and then said “I am going up there.” And he walked off the road and into the brush. A few minutes later he called out “I found it!” The only thing visible through the brush was part of the cast iron fence.   We had to climb over downed trees and push our way through the brush to get there. The ranger stated that even though the National Parks owns the land, the cemetery is still owned by the family.

    James dealing with a fallen tree

    James dealing with a fallen tree

    There was a tree that had been growing inside the plot that died and fell over damaging the fence. Hannah’s headstone was knocked over by the tree and was broken in half. Richard Jr and Eliza’s head stones had been tilted. According to Leroy a local Boy Scout troop, as a service project, cleaned up the cemetery in the late 1990’s, but the bushes rapidly regrew. The fence showed signs of having been painted.

    We had about two hours left in our schedule to do what we could do. The ranger station loaned some tools to us. We started calling the sticker bushes “Grab-me-gotchas” because they were long and ‘viney’ and after cutting them, when we tried to throw them outside the fence the Grab-me-gotchas would somehow wrap around our legs and poke us through our pants. We also cut up the tree.

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    Summer 2013

    In 2013 we returned with the supplies we needed to do some of the repairs. We ordered a headstone repair kit (medium kit 3-6 stones) from Polymer Concrete Inc. (http://www.tombstonerestoration.com) and had it shipped to Myer Country Motel where we stayed. We had to again find the plot because of the rapid re-growth of the brush.

    After cutting our way in, we began cleaning up Hannah’s headstone. When the headstone was originally set, the gap between the stone and the base (tongue and groove) should have been filled with molten lead, but it was not done. The first task was then to clean out the dirt and abrade the surfaces to be joined with a wire brush. Masking tape was put around the joint to protect the other surfaces from excess epoxy. The epoxy was mixed and put on the surfaces with a paint brush and extra epoxy used to fill the gap described. The surfaces of the break in the stone were then abraded. Wood stakes were clamped vertically to the lower half of the stone using ratcheting squeeze clamps. The stakes provided a means to align and secure the two halves. The epoxy was applied and the parts fitted together. The upper half of the stone was then clamped to the stakes. Extra epoxy was pushed into the gaps where the stone had chipped when it broke. A couple of days later we returned to remove the clamps and clean up.

    We will be returning this year and will give all the stones a good scrubbing, paint more of the fence, and try to slow the growth of the brush. We may also give some attention to the Van Gorden family stones outside the fence, if our time allows. Below is a description of how to find the cemetery.

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    If You Go

    Along the trail in 2013

    Along the trail in 2013

    The access road is located north of the Wheat Plains farm on the east side of Hwy 209. Coming south from Milford or Dingman’s Ferry, just past the Briscoe Mountain Rd, is the McDade Trail Access Road. The road sign is hard to read at highway speeds, so look for the Pocono Environmental Education Center sign.

    Turn left on the access road and follow it to the end (locked post). From there walk about ½ mile.

    McDade Trail marker; red arrow points to the twisted tree.

    McDade Trail marker; red arrow points to the twisted tree.

    At mile marker 15.5 (left hand side) stop and look to the right and look for the twisted tree. Enter the bushes between the twisted tree and the tree to the left. You are facing the direction of the cemetery. White paint dots were sprayed on the trees on right and left side of the “trail”.   The cemetery is about 100 yards from the road as the crow flies. Be sure to dress in clothes that cover you, and protect yourself from ticks and other insects. Rubber bands or duct tape and a good bug spray around the bottom of your pant legs acts as a good barrier. We did not find any ticks in the five trips to the cemetery.

    We are looking forward to our next trip to Dingman’s Ferry to visit the Brodhead/Linderman Cemetery and Wheat Plains Farm. We feel a special connection to our family there.

    How to get there

    How to get there

    Categories: Brodhead, Brodhead-Linderman Cemetery, Cemeteries, Linderman, Monroe Co., Stroudsburg | 5 Comments

    Rachael Brodhead Linderman (1803-1864): “a most estimable woman”

    "The Country Doctor" oil on Canvas. Source: http://www.wikigallery.org/; Author: Charles Stewart

    “The Country Doctor” oil on Canvas. Source:
    http://www.wikigallery.org/; Author: Charles Stewart, 1908 (I could not find an image of an early 19th century American country doctor–if anyone knows of one, please let me know!)

    Just as I was thrilled to find a physical description of the Hon. Richard Brodhead, the subject of the June 24th post, I was thrilled to find a glimpse of his daughter Rachael Brodhead‘s personality and disposition in the 1905 publication Historic homes and institutions and genealogical and personal memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania:

    [Rachael] …was a most estimable woman, whose gentle nature and kindly sympathies made her a dear friend of all with whom she was associated.

    Rachael was married to Pike county physician Dr. John Jordan Linderman. They lived on a property next door to Rachael’s parents (Richard and Hannah). The descriptions I found of him are equally pleasant to read: He treated his poor patients with as much consideration as he did those who were able to recompense him, and his cheery geniality made him an ideal physician in the sick room. His very large practice required him to cover quite a bit of territory—often making a daily journey of forty miles on horseback or twenty miles afoot in his professional rounds. WOW! Now that is dedication! He lived into his eighties, so obviously all that exercise did him good.

    Dr. Valentine Mott, one of John Linderman's mentors (Image from Memoir of Valentine Mott, M.D., LL. D.: Professor of Surgery in the University of the City of New York; Member of the Institute of France by Samuel David Gross (New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1868)

    Dr. Valentine Mott, one of John Linderman’s mentors (Image from Memoir of Valentine Mott, M.D., LL. D.: Professor of Surgery in the University of the City of New York; Member of the Institute of France by Samuel David Gross (New York: D. Appleton & Co., 1868)

    And he was evidently a man of great conviction; I was amused to read in the 1886 book History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania: He was the only man who voted for Clay’s election in Lehman township during the Polk and Clay Presidential contest, for which the Whigs of Easton presented him with a valuable double-barreled rifle, doubtless feeling that one who was able to stand alone in such a contest merited some kind of recognition.

    Portrait of Dr. David Hosack by Rembrandt Peale, 1826 (Wikipedia image)

    Portrait of Dr. David Hosack by Rembrandt Peale, 1826 (Wikipedia image) – Dr. Hosack was another mentor of John Linderman’s.

    Rachael and John had a daughter Sarah Maria Linderman and three sons, Dr. Henry R. Linderman (nearly six feet tall, of fine proportions and scholarly appearance, and possessed of a genial and polished address), Dr. Garret B. Linderman, and Albert Linderman. This and much more about them can be found on pages 934-938 of History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania, edited by Alfred Mathews  (Philadelphia: R. T. Peck & Co., 1886). A previous blog post on the Carbon County Packers, Lindermans and Brodheads also mentions members of this family.  Note: Some trees on Ancestry dot com show additional children, but I have not had time to verify that. Perhaps there were more kids, but these two old history books simply decided to mention only the most prominent and successful children? If anyone reading this knows of bona fide additional children, by all means leave a comment in the box below.

    Rachael and John were buried in Bethlehem’s Nisky Hill Cemetery. Please visit the Find a Grave site, if you are interested in seeing their resting places and those of other family members (oddly, John Linderman’s grave marker has ‘Jay’ for his middle name, while sources quoted here say ‘Jordon’):

    Rachael Brodhead Linderman
    Dr. John J. Linderman

    Below are clippings taken from the aforementioned books, identified accordingly. I hope you enjoy reading them and learning more about that offshoot of the Brodhead family tree. As always, corrections, comments, and suggestions are welcome.

    Historic homes and institutions and genealogical and personal memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania, Volume I, edited by John W. Jordan, Edgar Moore Green, and George T. Ettinger (NY/Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Co. 1905)

    From pp. 209-210 of Historic homes and institutions and genealogical and personal memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, Pennsylvania, Volume I, edited by John W. Jordan, Edgar Moore Green, and George T. Ettinger (NY/Chicago: The Lewis Publishing Co. 1905)

    Historic homes and institutions

    p. 937 of History of Wayne, Pike and Monroe Counties, Pennsylvania, Edited by Alfred Mathews (Philadelphia: R. T. Peck & Co., 1886)

    Garrett Brodhead Linderman, b. 1829

    Garrett Brodhead Linderman, b. 1829

    Henry R. Linderman

    Henry R. Linderman, b. 1825

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    Resources:

    Passion for the Past blog: The World of a 19th Century Country Doctor

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    UPDATE, 2 June 2016: One of this blog’s readers named Steve, who is researching Linderman/Brodhead lines, has provided me with the following information on the children of John and Rachael Linderman, and has given me permission to publish it here. Thank you, Steve!

    • Hannah Brodhead Linderman 11 Oct 1823 – 5 Jan 1898, md Jacob P Dailey
    • Henry Richard Linderman 25 Dec 1825 – 27 Jan 1879, md Emily Holland (or Harriet) Davis, had one son, Henry Richard Linderman Jr., who had no surviving children, but had a stepson.
    • Sarah Marie Linderman 15 Jul 1827 – 2 Apr 1903, never married
    • Garrett Brodhead Linderman 13 Oct 1829 – 28 Sep 1885, md 1st Lucy Evelyn Packer, 2nd Frances A Evans
    • Albert Brodhead Linderman 5 Feb 1832 – 28 Nov 1912, md 1st Clara Davis (possibly a married name, maiden name may be Jefferson, or vice versa) 2nd Ann (Annie) E Senseman
    • Bathsheba B Linderman 1836 – 1922, md Elijah W Maines
    • Emily E Linderman 23 May 1845 – 2 Dec 1915, md Charles W Anthony
    Categories: Brodhead, Linderman, Medical, Pike Co. | 4 Comments

    The Hon. Albert Gallatin Brodhead (1815-1891) of Mauch Chunk, PA

    Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait, *between p. 260 and p. 261

    Albert Gallatin Brodhead portrait, *between p. 260 and p. 261

    An upcoming post is going to mention the Honorable Albert Gallatin Brodhead, oldest brother of my second great grandfather Andrew Jackson Brodhead, so I thought I would take this moment to post a bio about Albert. It was published in 1905 in Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Personal Memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, PA* (see end of this post for full citation and a link to view the book online). This fabulous 500-plus-page book is rich with biographical information and portraits of many prominent individuals in Lehigh Valley history. If you have prominent ancestors who lived in that area, it would be worth checking the book’s index to see if your ancestor’s name appears there. Albert was the son of Garret Brodhead (1793-1872) and Cornelia Dingman (1797-1885), and had two other brothers besides my second great grandfather: Daniel Dingman Brodhead and Abram Coolbaugh Brodhead. In his younger years, Albert worked for the venerable Asa Packer. whose daughter Lucy Evelyn was married to Albert’s cousin Dr. Garret B. Linderman, son of Rachel Brodhead (Garret’s sister) and Dr. John J. Linderman.

    Brodhead_Albert_Gallatin_b1815

    A much younger Albert Gallatin Brodhead

    According to p. 674 of a different book The History of the Counties of Lehigh & Carbon, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, by Alfred Mathews & Austin N. Hungerford (published in Philadelphia, Pa., 1884), which is also rich in information, Albert settled in Mauch Chunk first, and his parents and brothers followed thereafter:  Hon. A. G. Brodhead came here in 1841, and has ever since been identified with railroad enterprises. He was made superintendent of the Beaver Meadow Railroad in 1850, and has filled the position with ability ever since, the name of his office changing with the ownership of the road, and now being superintendent of the Beaver Meadow Division of the Lehigh Valley Railroad. He has been prominently identified with the movements which brought the gas- and water-works into existence, and with other local enterprises, and in 1869 was elected to the State Senate. His father, Garret Brodhead, came to Mauch Chunk some years after his own settlement and died here, and his brothers, Andrew, Abram, and Daniel, also became residents in the valley.

    If you read the below bio on Albert, you will discover a man of great accomplishment and fine character. It greatly impressed me that—in addition to family members—700 guests showed up from all over the country to help Albert and his wife Sally celebrate their golden anniversary on July 3, 1888. A few years after that, his death came unexpectedly at the hands of a bout of flu from which he failed to recover. Even on his deathbed, he was thinking of others and making provisions to ensure his family would be properly cared for. Until I read this bio, I’d never realized that he died on the same month and day (18 Jan.) as both his parents (Garret, 18 Jan 1872; Cornelia, 18 Jan 1885). Quite an alignment of stars, I must say. But somehow that seems fitting—Albert, with all his accomplishments and having been the first-born child, may well have been the apple of their eye. And, in his final moments, the significance of that month and day may well have crossed his mind.  The description of Albert’s funeral, included in this bio, is poignant and shows just how beloved a figure he was in the Mauch Chunk community. He and his parents are buried in the Upper Mauch Chunk Cemetery.

    Note: Paragraph 1 of page 261 mentions an uncle ‘A. G. Gallatin’. This must be a reference to his uncle Albert Gallatin Brodhead, younger brother of Albert’s father Garret, and the person after whom young Albert was named.

    *Between p. 260 & p. 261

    *p. 260

    *p. 261

    *p. 261

    *p. 262

    *p. 262

    p. 263

    *p. 263

    *p. 264

    *p. 264

    *Historic Homes and Institutions and Genealogical and Personal Memoirs of the Lehigh Valley, PA, Volume II, by John Woolf Jordan Edgar Moore Green, and George Taylor Ettinger (Lehigh Valley, PA: Lewis Publishing Co., 1905) is available on Google eBooks. Click the link.

    Categories: Brodhead, Lehigh Valley, Linderman, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Mauch Chunk Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA, Packer, Tolan | Leave a comment

    19th-century Carbon County, PA — Lindermans, Packers, & Brodheads

    Postcard picture from 1915 of a "bird's eye view" of w:Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania, then known as "Mauch Chunk". (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain Image)

    Postcard picture from 1915 of a “bird’s eye view” of w:Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania, then known as “Mauch Chunk”. (Wikimedia Commons: Public Domain Image)

    Happy New Year! I hope a wonderful time was had by all this past Christmas. Best wishes for a happy and healthy 2014!

    Just a quick post to draw your attention to an interesting blog: Cultured Carbon County: Capturing the essence of Carbon County Pennsylvania’s history one story at a time.

    I came upon one of its posts, Mauch Chunk’s Plague Year and the Linderman Brothers – Love and Peril in Our Time of Cholera, while searching for information on Dr. Garret Brodhead Linderman (grandson of Richard H. Brodhead (1772-1843) and Hannah Drake whose daughter Rachel Brodhead married Dr. John J. Linderman). There is ton of information here, including some photos and newspaper clippings, and when you have time, it is well worth the read.

    Dr. Garrett B. Linderman and his brother Dr. Henry B. Linderman (once director of the Philadelphia mint) came to Mauch Chunk’s aid after a cholera epidemic struck the community in the 1850s (allegedly sparked by the huge influx of workers who’d come to the area for Lehigh Valley Railroad construction projects) and killed two of the small town’s three physicians. (Note: Mauch Chunk changed its name to Jim Thorpe in the 1950s.)

    Asa Packer Mansion in Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), PA (Wikimedia Commons-Image in public domain)

    Asa Packer Mansion in Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), PA (Wikimedia Commons-Image in public domain)

    Judge Asa Packer (From Portrait and Biographical Record of Lehigh, Northampton and Carbon Counties (Chicago: Chapman Publishing Company, 1894))

    Judge Asa Packer (From Portrait and Biographical Record of Lehigh, Northampton and Carbon Counties (Chicago: Chapman Publishing Company, 1894))

    Dr. Garrett Brodhead went on to marry Lucy Evelyn Packer, daughter of Judge Asa Packer (millionaire owner of Lehigh Valley Railroad, philanthropist of humble beginnings; founder of Lehigh University; donor of $33 million to Mauch Chunk and the Lehigh Valley) and Sarah Minerva Blakslee. Of the Packer’s seven children, Lucy was the only one to bear children. Garret became a major coal operator in the area and amassed a considerable fortune. Lucy and Garrett had five children. First- and second-born Asa and Harry died as infants. The remaining three were Sallie Linderman, Robert Packer Linderman, and Garret Brodhead Linderman, Jr. Sallie and Robert died quite young (Sallie** in 1898 at 38; Robert in 1903, at 39). (Sadly, the Linderman-Packer fortunes were caught up in a scandal brought on by lone surviving heir Garret B. Linderman Jr.’s fraudulent activities, for which he went to prison in 1908.)

    Linderman-Schwab Mansion in Fountain Hill Histori District, Bethlehem (Wikimedia Commons, Author Shuvaev, Taken 22 Jun 2013; Public Domain through Attribute Sharre-Alike 3.0)

    Linderman-Schwab Mansion in Fountain Hill Historic District, Bethlehem (Wikimedia Commons, Author Shuvaev, Taken 22 Jun 2013; Public Domain through Attribute Sharre-Alike 3.0)

    Lucy died in 1873, and Garrett Sr. remarried in 1880 to Frances Evans and had three daughters with her: Lillian, Ida, and Helen. Garrett Sr. died in 1885. Lucy’s sister Mary Packer Cummings, who had no children, was also very philanthropic. She bequeathed the Packer mansion in Mauch Chunk to the town of Mauch Chunk and the residence is now a museum.

    Looking at the family tree of my second great grandparents Andrew Jackson (A. J.) Brodhead (a 1st cousin of Dr. Garrett B. Linderman) and Ophelia Easton Brodhead, who lived for many years in Mauch Chunk, it’s easy to see what the Packer and Linderman names meant to them as residents of that town: A. J. and Ophelia included these surnames in the names of two of their children: Robert Packer Brodhead and Emily Linderman Brodhead Moon.

    Biographies of Garrett B. Linderman Sr. and his sons Robert and Garrett Jr. can be found in the National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, by James Terry White, published 1894:

    Garret B. Linderman Sr.

    Garret B. Linderman Sr.

    p165_Linderman_RP

    Robert P. Linderman

    p337_Linderman_GB

    Garrett Brodhead Linderman Jr.

    The Citizen newspaper, Honesdale, PA, Wednesday, 11 Aug 1909 (www.fultonhistory.com)

    The Citizen newspaper, Honesdale, PA, Wednesday, 11 Aug 1909

    ****************************************************************************************************************************************
    **Interesting side note: After Sallie Linderman died, her husband Warren Abbott Wilbur remarried to Kate Ellen Brodhead (daughter of Charles Brodhead and Camilla Mary Shimer / granddaughter of Albert Gallatin Brodhead and Ellen Middaugh / and great granddaughter of Hon. Richard H. Brodhead and Hannah Drake). So 1st wife Sallie and 2nd wife Kate were second cousins. Warren A. Wilbur and Kate Ellen Brodhead’s daughter Blanche married George Randolph Hearst, oldest son of William Randolph Hearst and his wife Millicent Veronica Wilson. UPDATE/CORRECTION FROM “STEVE”, 21 APR 2015: “Although this connection appears in a number of places, including FindAGrave, and several Ancestry.com trees, I’m pretty sure it’s not correct. Warren Willber had two children that I know of with his first wife, Sallie Packer Linderman: Robert Eldredge Wilbur, and Stella Wilbur. I think Stella died as an infant. He remarried in 1901 to Miss Kate Ellen Brodhead. She was 39 at the time, and Warren was 41. In the 1910 census, they are listed without any children, and in that census there is a column for number of children, and number of children living, and it shows 0 in both columns for Kate. By this time, Kate is 48, and Warren is 50. In the 1920 census, they again appear with no children. From this, I don’t see how they could have had a daughter named Blanche. The clincher however, is an article about a local girl, Blanche Wilbur, eloping with George Randolph Hearst. The only problem is, she was local to Idaho Falls, Idaho, her father is listed as O.K. Wilbur. The Blanche Wilbur that married Hearst was born around 1905. This Idaho connection is supported by the FindAGrave entry for Blanch, which is in conflict with the link there to Warren Wilbur.”

    Additional Resources:
    Find a Grave – Lindermans buried at Nisky Hill Cemetery in Bethlehem
    Find a Grave – Brodheads in Nisky Hill Cemetery, Bethlehem, PA
    Find a Grave – Packers at Nisky Hill Cemetery in Bethlehem
    Find a Grave – Packers in Mauch Chunk Cemetery
    Asa Packer Mansion Museum
    Lehigh University – Lucy Packer Linderman
    Robert Packer Linderman
    Fountain Hill, Bethlehem’s Elite
    Fountain Hill Historic District

    Categories: Bethlehem Northamp Co, Blakslee, Brodhead, Easton, Evergreen Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA, Linderman, Mauch Chunk (Jim Thorpe), Mauch Chunk Cemetery Jim Thorpe PA, Nisky Hill Cemetery Bethlehem, Packer | 2 Comments

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